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This is my code

def merge_lists(all_lst):
    if len(all_lst) < 2:
        return all_lst[0]   # get rid of the extra [] 
    left = merge_lists(all_lst[:len(all_lst)//2]) #[[2, 7, 10]]  ##[[0, 4, 6]]      
    right = merge_lists(all_lst[len(all_lst)//2:])#[[0, 4, 6], [3, 11]] ##[[3,11]]
    def merge(left,right):
        results = []
        while left and right:
            if left[0] < right[0]:
                results.append(left[0])
                left.remove(left[0])
            else:
                results.append(right[0])
                right.remove(right[0])
        results.extend(left)
        results.extend(right)
        return results
    return merge(left, right) 

I am able to get the answer when i put this

all_lst = [[2, 7, 10], [0, 4, 6], [3, 11]]
print(merge_lists(all_lst)) # [0, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 10, 11]

But when I tried to change it a little it doesn't work already

 all_lst = [[2, 7, 10], [0, 4, 6], [3, 11, 1]]
print(merge_lists(all_lst)) ##[0, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 10, 11, 1]

May I know what's wrong

share|improve this question
2  
You realise you can do: sorted(itertools.chain.from_iterable(all_lst)) for production code or if your lists are all sorted... list(heapq.merge(*all_lst)) –  Jon Clements Mar 16 at 17:49
    
@JonClements Good suggestion to use heapq, which yields an O(log k * n) algorithm where k is the number of lists and n is the total number of elements –  Niklas B. Mar 16 at 18:13

1 Answer 1

The third list is not sorted. When you do your final extend the 1 is inserted into the end of the final list. You should sort your lists before you call merge.

In other words your input should be:

 all_lst = [[2, 7, 10], [0, 4, 6], [1, 3, 11]]

They way merging works is that assumes that the sublists are ordered.

For example take those two lists:

left = [1, 3]
right = [2, 4]
results = []    

merging goes like this:

if left[0] < right[0]:
    results.append(left[0])
    left.remove(left[0])

so now

results = [1]
left = [3]
right = [2,4]

but if you had:

left = [3, 1]
right = [2, 4]
results = []   

merging goes like this:

if left[0] < right[0]: #false
else:
    results.append(right[0])
    right.remove(right[0])

so now

results = [2]
left = [3,1]
right = [4]

therefore you end up with an unordered final list.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't understand what you mean by sorting first then merge I thought already sorted it in my else: loop then merge ? @zbs –  user3398505 Mar 17 at 10:29
    
I can't use any python sort logarithm here and I know it would be easier if I use python sort logarithm –  user3398505 Mar 17 at 10:49
    
For a merge sorting to work the elements you are merging should be already sorted in respect to the other elements of their list. So if you want to merge 3 lists those lists should be sorted before trying to merge them. Like that: [[2, 7, 10], [0, 4, 6], [1, 3, 11]] –  zbs Mar 17 at 10:50
    
So you are saying that this part is wrong ? left = merge_lists(all_lst[:len(all_lst)//2]) right = merge_lists(all_lst[len(all_lst)//2:]) –  user3398505 Mar 17 at 11:53
    
i was thinking of letting left = left[0] and right = right = right[0] before i put it into merge but it doesn't work @zbs –  user3398505 Mar 17 at 11:54

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