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I ended up doing like this,

struct init
{
    CHAR Name[65];
};

void main()
{
    init i;

    char* _Name = "Name";

    int _int = 0;

    while (_Name[_int] != NULL)
    {
        i.Name[_int] = _Name[_int];
        _int++;
    }
}
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closed as not a real question by interjay, Benjamin Bannier, J. Steen, bmargulies, Yuck Nov 15 '12 at 14:37

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
so, what is the question? –  erelender Feb 11 '10 at 11:45
    
is that how you intialize it? –  cpx Feb 11 '10 at 11:48
3  
In C++ main() must return an int, and names like _Name reserved for the C++ implementation's use. –  anon Feb 11 '10 at 11:49
2  
Note: _Name is a compiler-reserved identifier, due to the leading underscore; so is _int. –  xtofl Feb 11 '10 at 11:59
1  
@xtofl: _int is not reserved at function scope. –  Roger Pate Feb 12 '10 at 2:53
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Give your structure a constructor:

struct init
{
  char Name[65];
  init( const char * s ) {
     strcpy( Name, s );
  }
};

Now you can say:

init it( "fred" );

Even without a constructor, you can initialise it:

init it = { "fred" };
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1  
Upvoted but I'd be happier with strncpy :) –  Manuel Feb 11 '10 at 12:00
    
+1, I liked the idea of constructor. –  cpx Feb 11 '10 at 12:14
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In C++, a struct can have a constructor, just like a class. Move the initialization code to the constructor. Also consider using a std::string instead of the char array.

struct init
{
    std::string name;

    init (const std::string &n) : name (n)
    {
    }
};
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I wish i could but it's one of the defined API structure i was working with. –  cpx Feb 11 '10 at 11:50
4  
@Dave17 Why couldn't you have made that clear in your question? Why do we always have to prise information out of you? –  anon Feb 11 '10 at 11:53
    
i'm sorry, won't happen. –  cpx Feb 11 '10 at 12:05
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You could also use strcpy() to copy your string data into the char array.

strcpy(i.Name, "Name");
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