Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In a coding style question about infinite loops, some people mentioned they prefer the for(;;) style because the while(true) style gives warning messages on MSVC about a conditional expression being constant.

This surprised me greatly, since the use of constant values in conditional expressions is a useful way of avoiding #ifdef hell. For instance, you can have in your header:

#ifdef CONFIG_FOO
extern int foo_enabled;
#else
#define foo_enabled 0
#endif

And the code can simply use a conditional and trust the compiler to elide the dead code when CONFIG_FOO isn't defined:

if (foo_enabled) {
    ...
}

Instead of having to test for CONFIG_FOO every time foo_enabled is used:

#ifdef CONFIG_FOO
if (foo_enabled) {
    ...
}
#endif

This design pattern is used all the time in the Linux kernel (for instance, include/linux/cpumask.h defines several macros to 1 or 0 when SMP is disabled and to a function call when SMP is enabled).

What is the reason for that MSVC warning? Additionally, is there a better way to avoid #ifdef hell without having to disable that warning? Or is it an overly broad warning which should not be enabled in general?

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

A warning doesn't automatically mean that code is bad, just suspicious-looking.

Personally I start from a position of enabling all the warnings I can, then turn off any that prove more annoying than useful. That one that fires anytime you cast anything to a bool is usually the first to go.

share|improve this answer

I think the reason for the warning is that you might inadvertently have a more complex expression that evaluates to a constant without realizing it. Suppose you have a declaration like this in a header:

const int x = 0;

then later on, far from the declaration of x, you have a condition like:

if (x != 0) ...

You might not notice that it's a constant expression.

share|improve this answer

I believe it's to catch things like

 if( x=0 )

when you meant

 if( x==0 )
share|improve this answer
    
Good point. This is one reason one sees "backwards" comparisons like "if (0 == x)" -- if you miss one = sign, the compiler catches it! –  bog Oct 22 '08 at 3:51
    
If that's what it wants to catch, couldn't it catch only that (assignment within a conditional) instead of a more general warning? –  CesarB Oct 22 '08 at 3:54
1  
That generates a different warning. With VC++ it's: Compiler Warning (level 4) C4706 assignment within conditional expression –  Ferruccio Oct 22 '08 at 4:00

A simple way to avoid the warning would be:

#ifdef CONFIG_FOO
extern int foo_enabled;
#else
extern int foo_enabled = 0;
#endif
share|improve this answer
    
Are you sure you can extern a variable and at the same time give it a value? What if it's initialized to a different value where it's defined? "static const int foo_enabled = 0;" would be a better choice. –  Jim Buck Oct 22 '08 at 4:59

Many works have been written, that blame using precompiler defines as constants in C++ . Will the following code work for you?

#ifdef CONFIG_FOO
extern int foo_enabled;
#else
const int foo_enabled = 0;
#endif
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.