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Whenever I used a German umlaut in a HTML file in the past, always I replaced it by ä, ö etc. according to this table.

I had no idea about encoding then, nor did I ever think about it.
I just "knew" that when I would just use ä, ö etc. instead, many computers in other countries wouldn't be able to display the umlauts correctly.

When I set the charset of an UTF-8 encoded HTML file to UTF-8 by putting <meta charset="utf-8"> into the header, do I still need to replace ä by &auml;, ö by &ouml; and so on?

For example:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
  <head>
    <meta charset="utf-8">
    <title>ÄÖÜäöüß</title>
  </head>
  <body>
    ÄÖÜäöüß
  </body>
</html>

When I save this in an UTF-8 encoded HTML file on my machine and view it in a browser, all umlauts are displayed correctly.
But I'm in Germany and everything on my machine is in German, so of course my machine is able to properly display German umlauts.

I read Joel's The Absolute Minimum Every Software Developer Absolutely, Positively Must Know About Unicode and Character Sets (No Excuses!), but this encoding stuff is all new to me.

From what I understand about encoding, UTF-8 and setting charsets, I'm suspecting that setting <meta charset="utf-8"> in an UTF-8 encoded HTML file means I do not need to use &auml; etc. anymore.
But I couldn't find a source that definitely says so.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

When I set the charset of a HTML file to UTF-8 by putting <meta charset="utf-8"> into the header

That doesn't set the character encoding. It declares which character encoding you are using. You must also make sure you are saving the HTML using that encoding.

Given that then:

do I still need to replace ä by &auml;, ö by &ouml; and so on?

No. Only characters with special meaning in HTML (<, >, &, ", ' … all of which only have special meaning in some contexts) must be replaced with character references.

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You must also make sure you are saving the HTML using that encoding. -> Good point. I mentioned it somewhere in the middle, but accidentally omitted it in the final question. I just edited my question, I hope it's clearer now. –  Christian Specht Mar 16 '14 at 22:20
1  
I’d also mention that any charset specified in the Content-Type header will take priority over any set in the meta tag. –  matt Mar 16 '14 at 22:39

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