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I currently have two large numpy arrays of equivalent lengths. The first array is filled with values in sets of 5 that will either be a set of 5 float values or 5 0s as such:

    [ [.03, 5, .1, 0.23, 5], [.1, .6, .8, 4.3], [0,0,0,0,0] ... ] 

The 2nd array is filled with values in the same fashion. I need to combine the two arrays so that at any position where array_two has a non zero value set, the corresponding position in array_one needs to be set to that value. If array_one already has a value then it should stay the same. That is kind of a mouthful so here is an example of what I am trying to explain should happen.

    Array one:  [ [.03, 5, .1, 0.23, 5], [0,0,0,0,0], [.1, .6, .8, 4.3, .2], [0,0,0,0,0], [0,0,0,0,0] ... ]

    Array two: [ [0,0,0,0,0], [0,0,0,0,0], [.1, .6, .8, 4.3], [0,0,0,0,0], 
    [32 ,2 , 4.6 , 3.4 , 0.2] ... ]

The resulting array should be :

    [ [.03, 5, .1, 0.23, 5], [0,0,0,0,0], [.1, .6, .8, 4.3, .2], [0,0,0,0,0], 
       [32 ,2 , 4.6 , 3.4 , 0.2] ...     ]

essentially the new array gets the value from array_two at position 5. This can't be accomplished with a sum because that would make position three twice what it should be.

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1 Answer 1

numpy.where is ment for situations like this:

import numpy as np
wh = (a != 0).any(1, keepdim=True)
# or for numpy version < 1.7
wh = (a != 0).any(1)[:, np.newaxis]
c = np.where(wh, a, b)

In your case numpy.maximum might also work.

c = np.maximum(a, b)
share|improve this answer
    
np.maximum seems like it potentially could be the most efficient, but some of the values are negative so it grabs the zeros. Is there a function along the lines of np.maximum_from_zero? –  zmachine123 Mar 17 '14 at 17:43
    
@zmachine123, Ya if you have negative values than maximum might not be the best choice. There's a few other ways to do this, but is there a reason you don't want to use where? –  Bi Rico Mar 17 '14 at 20:30
    
The where works fine actually I was just trying to be as efficient as possible but the where seems pretty efficient, thanks. –  zmachine123 Mar 17 '14 at 21:17

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