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In our development environment we have long been using a particular backup and restore script for each of our products through various SQL Server versions and different environment configurations with no issues.

Recently we have upgraded to SQL Server 2012 as our standard development server with SQL Compatibility Level 2005 (90) to maintain support with legacy systems. Now we find that on one particular dev's machine we get the following error when attempting to backup the database:

Cannot use the backup file 'D:\MyDB.bak' because it was originally formatted with sector size 512 and is now on a device with sector size 4096. BACKUP DATABASE is terminating abnormally.

With the command being:

BACKUP DATABASE MyDB TO  DISK = N'D:\MyDB.bak' WITH  INIT , NOUNLOAD ,  NAME = N'MyDB backup',  NOSKIP ,  STATS = 10,  NOFORMAT

The curious thing is that neither the hardware nor partitions on that dev's machine have changed, even though their sector size is different this has not previously been an issue.

From my research (i.e. googling) there is not a lot on this issue apart from the advice to use the WITH BLOCKSIZE option, but that then gives me the same error message.

With my query being:

BACKUP DATABASE MyDB TO  DISK = N'D:\MyDB.bak' WITH  INIT , NOUNLOAD ,  NAME = N'MyDB backup',  NOSKIP ,  STATS = 10,  NOFORMAT, BLOCKSIZE = 4096

Can anyone shed some light on how I can backup and restore a database to HDDs with different sector sizes?

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The backup is attempting to overwrite the old backup file via WITH INIT. Have you tried simply backing up to a different file name? BACKUP DATABASE MyDB TO DISK = N'D:\MyDB2.bak'... –  DMason Mar 17 '14 at 13:31
    
@DMason same error i'm afraid. –  codemonkeh Mar 17 '14 at 21:27
    
Hmmm. You mentioned the SQL 2012 upgrade, which doesn't seem like it should be an issue. What about the hardware? You mentioned the hardware and partitions haven't changed. So, it's still the same disk system, right? –  DMason Mar 18 '14 at 14:36
    
I found this article that mentions using trace flags to investigate: social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/sqlserver/en-US/… –  DMason Mar 18 '14 at 14:37
    
@DMason the hardware is literally the same, the only addition was a new version of SQL server. Curiously though i have noticed that this doesn't happen with another of our products on the same box, even though the database should be of a similar format. Thanks for the link I will give it a try. –  codemonkeh Mar 18 '14 at 23:01

3 Answers 3

It would seem that your issue is to do with the different sector sizes used by different drives.

You can fix this issue by changing your original backup command to:

BACKUP DATABASE MyDB TO  DISK = N'D:\MyDB.bak' WITH  INIT , NOUNLOAD ,  NAME = N'MyDB backup',  STATS = 10,  FORMAT

Note that I've changed NOFORMAT to FORMAT and removed NOSKIP.

Found a hint to resolving this issue in the comment section of the following blog post on MSDN: SQL Server–Storage Spaces/VHDx and 4K Sector Size

And more info regarding 4k sector drives: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/psssql/archive/2011/01/13/sql-server-new-drives-use-4k-sector-size.aspx

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We had the same problem going from 2005 to 2008. The problem was that we were trying to use the same backup file in 2008 that we used in 2005 (appending backups together into 1 file).

We changed the script to backed up to a different file and the problem was resolved. I would imagine that moving/deleting the old file would have the same affect

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In my case I had no enough free space on the disk.

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