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I have the following type signature in Haskell:

hi :: (b -> c) -> (a -> b) -> (a -> c)

I want to write a concrete implementation of it but I'm really struggling to understand where to start. I understand that hi takes a function (b -> c) which returns a function (a ->b) which finally returns a function (a -> c).

Can anyone show me an example of a concrete implementation? How do I know where to start with something like this and what goes on the left side of the definition?

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What is the purpose of hi? –  Oliver Charlesworth Mar 17 at 8:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 17 down vote accepted

One way to think of this is as a function that takes a (b -> c) and an (a -> b) and returns another function (a -> c). So let's start with that

hi f g = undefined       -- f :: b -> c, g :: a -> b

We know that the return type has to be a function (a -> c) so let's start with that -

hi f g = \a -> undefined -- f :: b -> c, g :: a -> b

We now have something of type a on the right hand side, and we have a function g :: a -> b so a sensible thing to do (in fact, the only thing we can do) is to apply g to a

hi f g = \a -> g a       -- ok, this fails to typecheck...

The expression g a has type b, and f :: b -> c, and we want to end up with a c. So again, there's only one thing we can do -

hi f g = \a -> f (g a)

And this type checks! We now start the process of cleaning up. We could move the a to the left of the equality sign

hi f g a = f (g a)

And, if you happen to know about the composition operator . you could notice that it can be used here

hi f g a = (f . g) a

Now the a is redundant on both sides

hi f g = f . g

and we can pull the . operator to the front of the expression by using its function form (.)

hi f g = (.) f g

Now the g and the f are both redundant

hi = (.)

So your function hi is nothing more than function composition.

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Ugh, I don't think I understand this part: We now have something of type a on the right hand side, and we have a function g :: a -> b so a sensible thing to do (in fact, the only thing we can do) is to apply g to a - how can you just decide to apply g to a? –  jcm Mar 17 at 11:03
    
A very comprehensive answer! For FP enthusiasts, I'd add that «the only thing we can do for this type» is a very interesting property called a free theorem: stackoverflow.com/questions/12421085/…) –  Yuuri Mar 17 at 11:10
1  
@cookiemonster You have a thing of type a, and you have a function with the right type to be applied to things of type a, and when you have those two things it's up to you whether to apply the function or not (but in this case you have to do something and applying the function is the only thing the type system allows you to do, so ...) –  Chris Taylor Mar 17 at 11:43
    
@ChrisTaylor ok, I think that makes sense. How about this statement: "We now start the process of cleaning up. We could move the a to the left of the equality sign" - how can you just decide to move a? How is this possible? –  jcm Mar 17 at 11:54
2  
@cookiemonster Because the two definitions f a = e and f = \a -> e mean the same thing, for any expression e. This kind of transformation (replacing one thing with another when they know they are equal) is called equational reasoning and is a very powerful approach to writing code. –  Chris Taylor Mar 17 at 12:01

You read it wrong: The -> operator is right-associative. Thus, your signature is: (b->c) -> ((a->b) -> (a->c)). So you can read it as : given a function from b to c, it returns a function that takes a function from a to b to finally returns a function from a to c.

From there, you should be able to resolve the exercise by yourself.

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