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An example of this would be:

myFunction()
   receive 
      msg1 -> io:format("Message 1!~n"),
              self() ! msg1,
              myFunction();
      msg2 -> io:format("Message 2!~n")
end.

I learnt to do my messages like msg1; but recently I made an error and compiled my code similar to msg2. When msg2 occurs, what happens afterwards? Does the process just sit at that same receive after msg2 and wait for other messages?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

if you don't call the function again at the end of a receive block, the process will die.(if you case, if you send msg2 to the process), but if you send other message(except for msg1 and msg2), the process will wait, and the messages are stored in the process's message queue.

-module(wy).
-compile(export_all).

myFunction() ->
receive 
    msg1 -> 
        io:format("Message 1!~n"),
        self() ! msg1,
        myFunction();
    msg2 -> 
        io:format("Message 2!~n")
end.
parent() ->
    Pid = spawn(fun myFunction/0),
    register(myFunction, Pid),
    erlang:monitor(process, Pid),
    receive
        Res -> io:format("Receive ~p~n", [Res])
    end.

main() ->
    spawn(fun() -> parent() end).

first you need execute wy:main().

(1) if you execute myFunction ! msg22., you can find the process myFunction is still alive, and use this command erlang:process_info(whereis(myFunction), messages)., you can find the message msg22 is stored in the message queue.

(2) if you execute myFunction ! msg2., you can get this output

Message 2!
Receive {'DOWN',#Ref<0.0.0.108>,process,<0.48.0>,normal}
msg2

from this output you can know the process myFunction is died.

(3) if you execute myFunction ! msg1, the process will go into endless loop。

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The other answers are almost correct. If you don't do a recursive call after receiving msg2 then the function will end and you will go back to the caller of myFunction/0. It will then depend on the caller what happens. If this is the last thing to do in the process then the process will terminate with reason normal, otherwise it will continue processing.

The thing to remember is that each call to receive will just process one message so if you want to keep processing messages then you must do repeated calls to receive. Hence the recursion in myFunction.

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Why don't you try it yourself?

If you don't call the function after receiving msg2, then there is nothing more to execute and your process will quit.

Does the process just sit at that same receive after msg2 and wait for other messages?

No. You need to call the function again. The recursion creates a loop.

When msg2 occurs, what happens afterwards?

Message 2!\n is printed and myFunction/0's code is no longer executed, and if the current process has nothing more to do it exits.

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