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I have "inherited" a simple congruential pseudo-random-number generator that looks like this:

  subroutine ribm(rndm,ial)
    implicit none
    integer :: ial
    real :: rndm, al
    ial=ial*65539
    if(ial.lt.0) then
      ial=ial+2147483647+1
    endif
    al=ial
    rndm=al*0.4656613e-9
  end subroutine ribm

The ial variable contains the RNG seed and it is initialised once outside the generator. The generator is supposed to produce pseudo-random numbers between 0 and 1, as usual. Therefore, ial must always stay non-negative. The code tries to enforce this condition using the if statement.

I test the generator using the following program:

program testribm
  implicit none
  real :: r
  integer :: i
  data i /12345/

  call ribm(r,i)
  call ribm(r,i)
  call ribm(r,i)
  call ribm(r,i)
  call ribm(r,i)
  call ribm(r,i)
  print *,r,i
contains
  subroutine ribm(rndm,ial)
  ! [...]
  end subroutine ribm
end program testribm

If I compile with gfortran v4.8.2 with optimisation -O1 or lower, I get:

 0.580895185      1247462939

OTOH, if I use -O2 I get:

-0.709615409     -1523887535

Note the negative seed value. Optimisation affects the integer arithmetics and the final result of the repeated calls to ribm.

I know how to work around/fix this problem. My question is: is this a gfortran bug? Or is this behaviour due to the fact that the code is non-standard? But if this is the case, shouldn't gfortran produce some warning message?

share|improve this question
    
BTW, even using or not using -fcheck=all changes the behavior. –  Vladimir F Mar 17 at 14:08
    
Interesting. Perhaps the compile-time checks prevent some optimisation to apply? –  Arek' Fu Mar 17 at 14:14
    
Turns out you get a warning message with -Wstrict-overflow. –  Arek' Fu Mar 17 at 16:22
    
The compile-time checks obviously prevent optimizing more calls of the subroutine away. –  Vladimir F Mar 17 at 16:24
    
Just added the correct warning to my answer according to your advice in the chat. –  Vladimir F Mar 17 at 16:25

3 Answers 3

I would add to M.S.B.'s answer, that the problem occurs only when the compiler optimizes several calls to ribm in one go. (My previous suggestion was invalid.)

But the answer to the original question. I don't think it's a compiler bug. 2147483647+1 is simply out of range. The question is why there is no warning even with -pedantic -Wall -Wextra. It turns out, pointed out by @Arek' Fu that one needs -Wstrict-overflow, whis is included only as -Wstrict-overflow=1 in -Wall.

Where possible, I recommend using functions iand, ior, ieor, ishft and similar for portable results, instead of arithmetic.

share|improve this answer
    
Your code snippet results in the same binary code for me. Using iand and friends is surely more portable, but is the internal integer representation format fixed by the standard? In other words, is there a portable way to flip the sign bit? –  Arek' Fu Mar 17 at 14:36
    
Not by the standards, but in practice you won't find machines other than two's complement en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Two%27s_complement –  Vladimir F Mar 17 at 14:41
    
I believe your algorithm also silently assumes that and won't work on others. –  Vladimir F Mar 17 at 14:42
    
The snippet really work with me even on -Ofast. It's different only with the optimizations, of course. –  Vladimir F Mar 17 at 14:44
    
Also works with ifort -fast ans sunf90 -fast. –  Vladimir F Mar 17 at 14:47

Optimization can change the actual calculations done. Don't be surprised if the results change for a non-standard calculation, such as one that involves integer overflow. My suggestion to implement algorithms in Fortran that use unsigned integers is to use the next-larger integer type. e.g., if the algorithm should be done with unsigned 32-bit integers, use Fortran's signed 64-bit integer.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, but is this particular result a problem or not? –  Vladimir F Mar 17 at 14:02
    
Note that the overflow here is probably inherent to the algorithm, which was maybe derived for unsigned arithmetic where overflows are well defined. –  Vladimir F Mar 17 at 14:03
    
@M. S. B., that's indeed how I fixed it. However, as Vladimir F correctly points out, overflow is inherent to this algorithm. I find it rather shocking that optimisation can produce code that is semantically inequivalent. It is as if the if statement were absent. –  Arek' Fu Mar 17 at 14:13
    
Yes, the correct way is to use 64-bit integers followed by use of the MOD intrinsic to fold the value back intothe correct range –  janneb Mar 17 at 14:32
    
I wish that Fortran had unsigned integers as a native type. –  M. S. B. Mar 18 at 0:38

both answers are nice, as for a solution, I would think using parenthesis is the right way to go to prevent the compiler optimizing away?

subroutine ribm(rndm,ial)
implicit none
integer :: ial
real :: rndm, al
ial=ial*65539
if(ial.lt.0) then
  ial=(ial+1)+2147483647
endif
al=ial
rndm=al*0.4656613e-9
end subroutine ribm
share|improve this answer
    
I fear -ffast-math could still join it. It joined even two separate assignments! –  Vladimir F Mar 18 at 8:34
    
That doesn't help. The question anyway is: is this behaviour a symptom of a compiler bug? Are overflowing variables non-standard by definition? –  Arek' Fu Mar 18 at 13:09
    
my implied answer was that I agreed with the other answers that it isn't a compiler bug, but that a correct way of avoiding the problem was to use parenthesis. However, I'm surprised that this wouldn't work, so maybe someone can update the other answers why this would also be optimized away? –  steabert Mar 18 at 13:34

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