Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
public static bool AllNodesChecked(TreeNodeCollection nodes)        
{
    foreach (TreeNode node in nodes)
    {
        if (!node.Checked)
        {
            return false;
        }
        AllNodesChecked(node.Nodes);
    }
    return true;
}

Test tree is

A1(checked) -> B1(unchecked)
A2(checked)
A3(checked)

but it isn't returning when it hits node B1.

EDIT: Thank you all for helping my tired brain. Recursion should only be attempted early in the day after a cold shower.

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 20 down vote accepted

You are ignoring the return value of AllNodesChecked in the recursive call:

public static bool AllNodesChecked(TreeNodeCollection nodes)        
{
    foreach (TreeNode node in nodes)
        if (!node.Checked || !AllNodesChecked(node.Nodes))
           return false;
    return true;
}

The return statement only returns from the current method in the call stack to the immediate caller. It doesn't suddenly return from all other calls above in the call stack.

share|improve this answer
    
Doh - thank you! –  Iain Holder Feb 11 '10 at 16:10
3  
+1 for not comparing a boolean to a literal! –  Josh Stodola Feb 11 '10 at 16:15
    
Yes I noticed that too. I blame it on the fact it isn't called IsChecked like it should be. :-) –  Iain Holder Feb 12 '10 at 10:40

Change:

AllNodesChecked(node.Nodes); 

To:

if(!AllNodesChecked(node.Nodes))
    return false;
share|improve this answer

I would take a slightly different approach here. What I'd do is I'd first write code that turns your tree (which I assume really is a tree, not an arbitrary graph) into a sequence of nodes. Something like:

static IEnumerable<Node> AllNodes(this Node node)
{
    var stack = new Stack<Node>();
    stack.Push(node);
    while(stack.Count > 0)
    {
        var current = stack.Pop();
        yield return current;
        foreach(var child in current.Nodes)
            stack.Push(child);
    }
}

and now you can use sequence operators:

bool allChecked = root.AllNodes().All(x=>x.Checked);

No recursion, no problem.

share|improve this answer
3  
I think recursion is the more natural and readable way to solve these kind of "tree" problems (unless the tree is expected to be larger than the call stack can accommodate). –  Mehrdad Afshari Feb 11 '10 at 16:19
    
Thanks Eric! However still on 2.0 at work. I know you can hack extension methods but don't want to risk it. –  Iain Holder Feb 11 '10 at 16:22
2  
@Mehrdad: I agree, it is more elegant to use recursion on a recursive data structure. However, (1) lack of tail recursion, (2) catastrophic failure when stack is blown, (3) recursive iterator blocks are inefficient, (4) sequence operators rock. These points push me towards iterative solutions that reinterpret recursive data structures as unstructured sequences. –  Eric Lippert Feb 11 '10 at 16:43
1  
@Eric: Totally agree with (4)! Agree with (3). (2) may not be the case in many cases where the data structure is supposed to be very small and it's kind of an "optimization", but definitely true if it can be large. The main point, (1), what are you guys going to do about it? ;) Are we ever going to see these F# fans harassing us for the lack of tail recursion in the C# compiler itself go away? –  Mehrdad Afshari Feb 11 '10 at 16:49
    
@Mehrdad - just to rub it in, I believe that F# also solves point 3, in that the yield! operator does what a hypothetical yield foreach would do in C#. –  kvb Feb 11 '10 at 17:49

You're not evaluating the result of the recursive call to check child nodes.

share|improve this answer

Try this:

public static bool AllNodesChecked(TreeNodeCollection nodes)         
{ 
    foreach (TreeNode node in nodes) 
    { 
        if (node.Checked == false || !AllNodesChecked(node.Nodes)) 
        { 
            return false; 
        } 
    } 
    return true; 
} 
share|improve this answer

I have to add my two cents.... Learn to functional programming IMHO.

public static bool AllNodesChecked(TreeNodeCollection nodes)  
{
    return nodes.All(i => i.Checked && AllNodesChecked(i.Nodes));
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.