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Given this HTML:

<div>foo</div><div>bar</div><div>baz</div>

How do you make them display inline like this:

foo bar baz

not like this:

foo
bar
baz

share|improve this question

19 Answers 19

up vote 171 down vote accepted

That's something else then:

<style type="text/css">
div.inline { float:left; }
.clearBoth { clear:both; }
</style>
<div class="inline">1<br />2<br />3</div>
<div class="inline">1<br />2<br />3</div>
<div class="inline">1<br />2<br />3</div>
<br class="clearBoth" /><!-- you may or may not need this -->
share|improve this answer
    
actually this was the only way i found to display inline correctly i don't know why the no-float solution did not work.... – Necronet Mar 4 '11 at 23:28
15  
The css class names here should not be used as an example. Use proper semantic naming like: css-tricks.com/semantic-class-names – Berik Mar 20 '13 at 14:44

An inline div is a freak of the web & should be beaten until it becomes a span (at least 9 times out of 10)...

<span>foo</span>
<span>bar</span>
<span>baz</span>

...answers the original question...

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7  
There are times when you want divs to display inline, for example, when you want to add a margin on the left and right of an element. I don't think that can be done with a span. Steve should probably be using float instead of inline though. – Darryl Hein Oct 7 '10 at 6:20
7  
padding yes, not margin – SiGanteng May 20 '11 at 8:07
2  
Unfortunately, HTML5 does not support putting a div inside a <span>. I used to use <span>s to put CSS styles on a section and not have the browser interpret the section as a block and force its block layout on me. But I just discovered today while porting my page to JQuery Mobile+HTML5 that if you have a <div> within a <span> the HTML5 validator will complain that it is invalid HTML5 so there are cases where using the <span> tag instead of an inline <div> is not feasible, at least with HTML5. – Kmeixner Jan 9 '13 at 23:12
36  
This does not answer the question and definitely should not have been upvoted 100 times. – Vael Victus Feb 3 '13 at 1:36
2  
Sometimes though you are living in a world you didn't create and the only thing you can change in the CSS. In that case style="display: inline" works nicely. – Matthew Lock Oct 17 '14 at 2:06

Try writing it like this:

<div style="display: inline">a</div>
<div style="display: inline">b</div>
<div style="display: inline">c</div>
share|improve this answer
13  
This is the correct answer to the question, but considering the accepted answer, I suspect the question doesn't address the real scenario. – Steve Perks Dec 31 '08 at 16:10
4  
Does not work in IE... – NexusRex Aug 3 '11 at 15:53

Having read this question and the answers a couple of times, all I can do is assume that there's been quite a bit of editing going on, and my suspicion is that you've been given the incorrect answer based on not providing enough information. My clue comes from the use of br tag.

Apologies to Darryl. I read class="inline" as style="display: inline". You have the right answer, even if you do use semantically questionable class names ;-)

The miss use of br to provide structural layout rather than for textual layout is far too prevalent for my liking.

If you're wanting to put more than inline elements inside those divs then you should be floating those divs rather than making them inline.

Floated divs:

===== ======= ==   **** ***** ******   +++++ ++++
===== ==== =====   ******** ***** **   ++ +++++++
=== ======== ===   ******* **** ****   
===== ==== =====                       +++++++ ++
====== == ======

Inline divs:

====== ==== ===== ===== == ==== *** ******* ***** ***** 
**** ++++ +++ ++ ++++ ++ +++++++ +++ ++++

If you're after the former, then this is your solution and lose those br tags:

<div style="float: left;" >
  <p>block level content or <span>inline content</span>.</p>
  <p>block level content or <span>inline content</span>.</p>
</div>
<div style="float: left;" >
  <p>block level content or <span>inline content</span>.</p>
  <p>block level content or <span>inline content</span>.</p>
</div>
<div style="float: left;" >
  <p>block level content or <span>inline content</span>.</p>
  <p>block level content or <span>inline content</span>.</p>
</div>

note that the width of these divs is fluid, so feel free to put widths on them if you want to control the behavior.

Thanks, Steve

share|improve this answer

Use display:inline-block with a margin and media query for IE6/7:

<html>
  <head>
    <style>
      div { display:inline-block; }
      /* IE6-7 */
      @media,
          {
          div { display: inline; margin-right:10px; }
          }
   </style>
  </head>
  <div>foo</div>
  <div>bar</div>
  <div>baz</div>
</html>
share|improve this answer

<span> ?

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1  
I think we are talking about inlining block elements that can have width and height. Imagine a div with a background image that you want to flow inline with text. – NexusRex Aug 3 '11 at 16:21

As mentioned, display:inline is probably what you want. Some browsers also support inline-blocks.

http://www.quirksmode.org/css/display.html#inlineblock

share|improve this answer
    
Does not work in IE... – NexusRex Aug 3 '11 at 15:53
2  
@NexusRex there is work around to get IE to behave correctly however display:inline is the correct answer. I believe the work around is: display: inline-block; *display: inline; *zoom: 1; setting zoom forces IE to treat the element like a block element. – Chris Stephens Oct 17 '11 at 22:37

Just use a wrapper div with "float: left" and put boxes inside also containing float: left:

CSS:

wrapperline{
width: 300px;
float: left;
height: 60px;
background-color:#CCCCCC;}

.boxinside{
width: 50px;
float: left;
height: 50px;
margin: 5px;
background-color:#9C0;
float:left;}

HTML:

<div class="wrapperline">
<div class="boxinside">Box 1</div>
<div class="boxinside">Box 1</div>
<div class="boxinside">Box 1</div>
<div class="boxinside">Box 1</div>
<div class="boxinside">Box 1</div>
</div>
share|improve this answer

ok, for me :

<style type="text/css">
    div{
        position: relative;
        display: inline-block;
        width:25px;
        height:25px;
    }
</style>
<div>toto</div>
<div>toto</div>
<div>toto</div>
share|improve this answer
    
thx for display: inline-block; – WBAR Sep 10 '15 at 23:22

I know people say this is a terrible idea, but it can in practice be useful if you want to do something like tile images with comments underneath them. e.g. Picasaweb uses it to display the thumbnails in an album.
See for example/demo http://closure-library.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/closure/goog/demos/inline_block_quirks.html ( class goog-inline-block ; I abbreviate it to ib here )

/* below is a set of hacks to make inline-block work right on divs in IE. */
html > body .ib { display:inline-block; }
.ib {display:inline-block;position:relative;}
* html .ib { display: inline; }
:first-child + html .ib { display:inline; }

Given that CSS, set your div to class ib, and now it's magically an inline block element.

share|improve this answer
    
This works well in newer IE browsers, but not IE6. – NexusRex Aug 3 '11 at 16:18

I would use spans or float the div left. The only problem with floating is that you have to clear the float afterwards or the containing div must have the overflow style set to auto

share|improve this answer
    
I believe we are talking about a div inline with text or other, not floated to one side. – NexusRex Aug 3 '11 at 16:23
    
When using float: left, with overflow: auto on the containing div, how/when would the scrollbar that the overflow could come into play? – cellepo Oct 22 '14 at 22:10

You need to contain the three divs. Here is an example:

CSS

div.contain
{
  margin:3%;
  border: none;
  height: auto;
  width: auto;
  float: left;
}

div.contain div
{
  display:inline;
  width:200px;
  height:300px;
  padding: 15px;
  margin: auto;
  border:1px solid red;
  background-color:#fffff7;
  -moz-border-radius:25px; /* Firefox */
  border-radius:25px;
}

Note: border-radius attributes are optional and only work in CSS3 compliant browsers.

HTML

<div class="contain">
  <div>Foo</div>
</div>

<div class="contain">
  <div>Bar</div>
</div>

<div class="contain">
  <div>Baz</div>
</div>

Note that the divs 'foo' 'bar' and 'baz' are each held within the 'contain' div.

share|improve this answer
    
Display! Not diplay! – Spaceghost Nov 9 '11 at 22:21
<style type="text/css">
div.inline { display:inline; }
</style>
<div class="inline">a</div>
<div class="inline">b</div>
<div class="inline">c</div>
share|improve this answer

we can do this like

.left {
    float:left;
    margin:3px;
}
<div class="left">foo</div>
<div class="left">bar</div>
<div class="left">baz</div>
share|improve this answer
<div class="cdiv">
<div class="inline"><p>para 1</p></div>
 <div class="inline">
     <p>para 1</p>
     <span>para 2</span>
     <h1>para 3</h1>
</div>
 <div class="inline"><p>para 1</p></div>

http://jsfiddle.net/f8L0y5wx/

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<div>foo</div><div>bar</div><div>baz</div>
//solution 1
<style>
    #div01, #div02, #div03 {
                                float:left;
                                width:2%;
    }   
 </style>
 <div id="div01">foo</div><div id="div02">bar</div><div id="div03">baz</div>

 //solution 2

 <style>
      #div01, #div02, #div03 {
                                  display:inline;
                                  padding-left:5px;
      }   
</style>
<div id="div01">foo</div><div id="div02">bar</div><div id="div03">baz</div>

 /* I think this would help but if you have any other thoughts just let me knw      kk */
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I just tend to make them fixed widths so that they add up to the total width of the page - probably only works if you are using a fixed width page. Also "float".

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I think you can use this way without using any css -

<table>
 <tr>
  <div>foo</div>
 </tr>
 <tr>
  <div>bar</div>
 </tr>
 <tr>
  <div>baz</div>
 </tr>
</table>
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first of all,

You should use <span> instead of <div> for correct way of inline-block. because div is block level elements, and your requirement is for inline-block level elements.

Here is html code as per your requirements :

<div class="main-div">
 <div>foo</div>
 <div>bar</div>
 <div>baz</div>`
</div>

You've two option to do this


  • use simple display:inline-block;
  • or use float:left;

so you've to change display property display:inline-block; forcefully,

Example for first div{display:inline-block;}


Example for Second div{float:left;} // you need to clear float .main-div:after{content:"";clear:both;display:table;}

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