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Lets say I have a ushort value that I would like to set bits 1 to 4 inclusive (assuming 0 is the LSB and 15 is the MSB).

In C++ you could define a struct that mapped out specific bits:

struct KibblesNBits
{
   unsigned short int TheStart: 1;
   unsigned short int TheMeat:  4;
   unsigned short int TheRest: 11;
}

Then you could assign a value to 'TheMeat' directly. I'm looking to do something similar in C#. Ideally, I would like a funcion definition that looked like this:

public ModValue SetRange<ModValue, RangeValue>(ModValue valueToMod, int startIndex, int endIndex, RangeValue rangeValueToAssign)

It would also need to valide that the rangeValueToAssign does not exceed the maximum size (assuming values are unsigned from 0 to max). So if the range is from 1 to 4, this is 4 bits, range would be from 0 to 15. If it is outside these limits, throw an exception.

I didnt find anything in the BitConverter class that could do something like this. Best I could think of was using manaul shift operators. Is there a better way to do this?

Edit: A non generic version might look something like this:

  public static ushort SetRange(ushort valueToMod, int startIndex, int endIndex, ushort rangeValueToAssign)
  {
     // Determine max value
     ushort max_value = Convert.ToUInt16(Math.Pow(2.0, (endIndex - startIndex) + 1.0) - 1);
     if(rangeValueToAssign > max_value) throw new Exception("Value To Large For Range");
     // Shift the value and add it to the orignal (effect of setting range?)
     ushort value_to_add = (ushort)(rangeValueToAssign << startIndex);
     return (ushort)(valueToMod + value_to_add);
  }

Where:

ushort new_val = SetRange(120, 1, 2, 3);

would result in 'new_val' being set to 126.

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1  
Whats wrong with shift operators? they would provide the best performance here... –  TJMonk15 Feb 11 '10 at 17:34
    
@TJMonk15 - I guess nothing is wrong with them, just looking for a generic solution or seeing if there was a different way to do it that I am just missing –  SwDevMan81 Feb 11 '10 at 17:37
    
Please post a snippet of code illustrating how you would like to use this device. I'm still a little unclear as to what you want SetRange to do, exactly. –  John Dibling Feb 11 '10 at 17:59
    
@John - Ok I added a non generic example of what I'm trying to accomplish. Let me know if you still have more questions –  SwDevMan81 Feb 11 '10 at 18:16
1  
@SwDevMan81: just so you know, your non generic implementation doesnt actually set those bits. If any of those bits are already set, it wont prodcue the correct result. Let me post a fix as an answer... –  TJMonk15 Feb 12 '10 at 21:48

4 Answers 4

public static int SetRange(int num, int from, int to, int value)
{
    if (from < 0 || from > to || to >= 32) throw new ArgumentException("from/to are not valid");
    if (value >= (2 << (to - from)) && (to - from < 31)) throw new ArgumentException("value is too large");
    return num & ~(((2 << to) - 1) - ((1 << from) - 1)) | (value << from);
}

No for-loops or Math.Pow (which is amazingly slow, way slower than Sin/Cos etc).

As for generic - sorry, that won't work. There is no base type for numbers in C# (or .NET), so this is simply impossible. It looks like you're trying to use generics like template functions in C++ - don't be fooled by the similar looks; they are completely different.

If you must have different types, I'd suggest overloads instead.

public static int SetRange(int num, int from, int to, int value)
{
    if (from < 0 || from > to || to >= 32) throw new ArgumentException("from/to are not valid");
    if (value >= (2 << (to - from)) && (to - from < 31)) throw new ArgumentException("value is too large");
    return num & ~(((2 << to) - 1) - ((1 << from) - 1)) | (value << from);
}

public static ushort SetRange(ushort num, int from, int to, ushort value)
{
    if (from < 0 || from > to || to >= 16) throw new ArgumentException("from/to are not valid");
    if (value >= (2 << (to - from))) throw new ArgumentException("value is too large");
    return (ushort) (num & ~(((2 << to) - 1) - ((1 << from) - 1)) | (value << from));
}

However, in C# it might be more idiomatic to just always use int (or long if you need that).

share|improve this answer

Here is a fix for your update:

  public static ushort SetRange(ushort valueToMod, int startIndex, int endIndex, ushort rangeValueToAssign)
  {
     // Determine max value
     ushort max_value = Convert.ToUInt16(Math.Pow(2.0, (endIndex - startIndex) + 1.0) - 1);
     if(rangeValueToAssign > max_value) throw new Exception("Value To Large For Range");
     // Clear our bits where we want to "Set" the value for
     for( int i=startIndex; i<endIndex; i++ )
         valueToMod &= ~(1<<i);
     // Shift the value and add it to the orignal (effect of setting range?)
     ushort value_to_add = (ushort)(rangeValueToAssign << startIndex);
     return (ushort)(valueToMod + value_to_add);
  }
share|improve this answer
    
Nice, ok now just make it generic and I'm sold –  SwDevMan81 Feb 12 '10 at 22:26
    
Ghhh! Math.Pow? Ugly! Use bitwise shift (like in your for loop) instead. –  vladr Feb 27 '10 at 7:19
2  
Umm, that was his code.... –  TJMonk15 Mar 1 '10 at 16:32

I don't know of any language feature (apart from manually shifting bits around) that would achieve this.

The only thing that comes to my mind is the old BitArray from .NET 1.1. But you can only manipulate individual bits, not ranges of bits.

So, no.

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If you want that type of access, consider a BitVector32 or BitArray, or get familiar with bitwise arithmetic. You can do explicit layout of structs in C# (causing a union), but I don't think it is to your advantage. It is primarily aimed at interop scenarios.

For info, the bitwise operators work mainly on uint/int/ulong/long - not so much the smaller integer types.

share|improve this answer
    
@Marc - Thanks, do you know off hand if either of those have a SetRange feature that I am looking for. I dont see anything in the msdn pages for either. –  SwDevMan81 Feb 11 '10 at 17:42
    
@SwDevMan81 - no but you could write an extension method for them easily enough? –  Marc Gravell Feb 11 '10 at 17:44

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