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I have a data table:

(f <- data.table(id1=c(1,2,3,1,2,3),
                 id2=as.factor(c("a","a","b","c","b","d")),
                 v=1:6,
                 key=c("id1","id2")))
   id1 id2 v
1:   1   a 1
2:   1   c 4
3:   2   a 2
4:   2   b 5
5:   3   b 3
6:   3   d 6
> str(f)
Classes ‘data.table’ and 'data.frame':  6 obs. of  3 variables:
 $ id1: num  1 1 2 2 3 3
 $ id2: Factor w/ 4 levels "a","b","c","d": 1 3 1 2 2 4
 $ v  : int  1 4 2 5 3 6
 - attr(*, "sorted")= chr  "id1" "id2"
 - attr(*, ".internal.selfref")=<externalptr> 

How do I add the "missing" rows?

I.e., for each existing id1 I want all possible values of id2 to be present (with v=0).

So, I need to add 6 rows (3 possible values of id1 * 4 possible values of id2 - 6 existing rows).

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I'd get the unique values in id1 and id2 and do a join using data.table's cross join function CJ as follows:

# you've already set the key
ans <- f[CJ(unique(id1), unique(id2))][is.na(v), v := 0L]
ans
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1  
I look at f after running this and still see six rows. Add a [] to the end? Or, I guess, assigning this somewhere works, too. –  Frank Mar 17 at 18:50
f[, {
  tab = table(id2)
  x = as.numeric(tab)
  x[x != 0] = v
  list(id2 = names(tab), v = x)
}, by = id1]

##    id1 id2 v
##  1:   1   a 1
##  2:   1   b 0
##  3:   1   c 4
##  4:   1   d 0
##  5:   2   a 2
##  6:   2   b 5
##  7:   2   c 0
##  8:   2   d 0
##  9:   3   a 0
## 10:   3   b 3
## 11:   3   c 0
## 12:   3   d 6
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+1 Multiple lines would be easier to read... –  Frank Mar 17 at 18:49
1  
FYI, calling table on each grouping of id1 would slow things down... –  Arun Mar 17 at 19:01

This makes a new table with all 12 = 4*3 entries and then fills in values from your first data.table:

ff <- f[,CJ(id1=unique(id1),id2=unique(id2))]  # get id1, id2 combos, set as key
ff[f,v:=v]                                     # copy values from f
ff[is.na(v),v:=0L]                             # set others to zero

To avoid the costly by-without-by implicit in my second line, you could instead use

ff[ff[f, which=TRUE], v := f$v]

as @Arun suggested. As far as I understand, this will not be a problem after data.table 1.9.3.

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@Arun Ah, didn't think of that. I just read data.table 1.9.3 news this morning... this'll avoid by-without-by once that's out -- per "Accordingly, X[Y,j] now does what X[Y][,j] did." -- right? Your suggestion here works, so I'll add it in. –  Frank Mar 17 at 19:11
    
Frank, I deleted just to verify that it gets slow. And it does get slow (due to by-without-by) on bigger tables. In 1.9.3, for this case, it won't do a by at all (not explicitly stated) and it'll return the right results here, but one has to be careful ex: if the j operation was v := v/max(v), then, max(v) here will be max(entire v), not per group. Also, the which won't work if there are multiple matches I think. This is a little complicated procedure, maybe.. –  Arun Mar 17 at 19:32
    
@Arun Okay, good to keep in mind. Thanks –  Frank Mar 17 at 19:40

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