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How do you improve your ASP.NET MVC application performance?

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Should be Wikified –  Neil N Feb 11 '10 at 17:35
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Sorry, but saying that using forms authentication makes application faster doesn't make sense to me:) Does windows authentication or other type make application slower? "Do not use sessions" doesn't say much too. Using Session in most cases won't really slow down application. –  LukLed Feb 11 '10 at 17:45
    
@Neil How could I do it? : O –  SDReyes Feb 11 '10 at 18:05
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The stuff that is an 'answer' in the question should be pulled down into an accepted answer. and everyone can add theirs to that accepted answer. –  George Stocker Feb 11 '10 at 18:19
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I moved the 'answer' stuff that was in the question into its own answer and marked it community wiki so the community could add to it. Plus the bold was killing me. stackoverflow.com/questions/2246251/… –  George Stocker Feb 11 '10 at 18:22

10 Answers 10

up vote 134 down vote accepted
+50

A compiled list of possible sources of improvement are below:

General

  • Make use of a profiler to discover memory leaks and performance problems in your application. personally I suggest dotTrace
  • Run your site in Release mode, not Debug mode, when in production, and also during performance profiling. Release mode is much faster. Debug mode can hide performance problems in your own code.

Caching

  • Use CompiledQuery.Compile() recursively avoiding recompilation of your query expressions
  • Cache not-prone-to-change content using OutputCacheAttribute to save unnecessary and action executions
  • Use cookies for frequently accessed non sensitive information
  • Utilize ETags and expiration - Write your custom ActionResult methods if necessary
  • Consider using the RouteName to organize your routes and then use it to generate your links, and try not to use the expression tree based ActionLink method.
  • Consider implementing a route resolution caching strategy
  • Put repetitive code inside your PartialViews, avoid render it xxxx times: if you end up calling the same partial 300 times in the same view, probably there is something wrong with that. Explanation And Benchmarks

Routing

Security

  • Use Forms Authentication, Keep your frequently accessed sensitive data in the authentication ticket

DAL

Load balancing

  • Utilize reverse proxies, to spread the client load across your app instance. (Stack Overflow uses HAProxy (MSDN).

  • Use Asynchronous Controllers to implement actions that depend on external resources processing.

Client side

  • Optimize your client side, use a tool like YSlow for suggestions to improve performance
  • Use AJAX to update components of your UI, avoid a whole page update when possible.
  • Consider implement a pub-sub architecture -i.e. Comet- for content delivery against reload based in timeouts.
  • Move charting and graph generation logic to the client side if possible. Graph generation is a expensive activity. Deferring to the client side your server from an unnecessary burden, and allows you to work with graphs locally without make a new request (i.e. Flex charting, jqbargraph, MoreJqueryCharts).
  • Use CDN's for scripts and media content to improve loading on the client side (i.e. Google CDN)
  • Minify -Compile- your JavaScript in order to improve your script size
  • Keep cookie size small, since cookies are sent to the server on every request.

Global configuration

  • If you use Razor, add the following code in your global.asax.cs, by default, Asp.Net MVC renders with an aspx engine and a razor engine. This only uses the RazorViewEngine.

    ViewEngines.Engines.Clear(); ViewEngines.Engines.Add(new RazorViewEngine());

  • Add gzip (HTTP compression) and static cache (images, css, ...) in your web.config <system.webServer> <urlCompression doDynamicCompression="true" doStaticCompression="true" dynamicCompressionBeforeCache="true"/> </system.webServer>

  • Remove unused HTTP Modules
  • Flush your HTML as soon as it is generated (in your web.config) and disable viewstate if you are not using it <pages buffer="true" enableViewState="false">
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The nissanfan links don't seem to work. :( –  JTew Feb 11 '10 at 21:48
    
Thanks for your feedback Jtew +1 –  SDReyes Feb 11 '10 at 22:46
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Content reordered, categorized and reviewed ; ) –  SDReyes Feb 12 '10 at 14:16
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wait you mean i do lose performance when i e.g. have a view that displays a result set by irritating through an IList and call Render.PartialView("Row", item) for each list item? how much do i lose? or how could i measure the performance gain? –  marc.d Feb 12 '10 at 15:03
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@marc.d pretty sure you meant iterating, but irritating through an IList made me smile... :) –  ssmith Feb 4 '11 at 22:20

Code Climber and this blog entry provide detailed ways of increasing application's performance.

Compiled query will increase performance of your application, but it has nothing in common with ASP.NET MVC. It will speed up every db application, so it is not really about MVC.

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Thank you Luk +1! You're right, nonetheless I think it will be useful for lots of MVC developers to know, what do you think? : ) Updating title accordingly... thanks again1! –  SDReyes Feb 11 '10 at 17:51

Not an earth shattering optimization but I thought I'd throw this out there - Use CDN's for jquery, etc.

Quote from ScottGu himself: The Microsoft Ajax CDN enables you to significantly improve the performance of ASP.NET Web Forms and ASP.NET MVC applications that use ASP.NET AJAX or jQuery. The service is available for free, does not require any registration, and can be used for both commercial and non-commercial purposes.

We even use the CDN for our webparts in Moss that use jquery.

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Thanks BnkDev +1 Adding to the list.... –  SDReyes Feb 11 '10 at 17:30

This may seem obvious, but run your site in Release mode, not Debug mode, when in production, and also during performance profiling. Release mode is much faster. Debug mode can hide performance problems in your own code.

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Basic suggestion is to follow REST principals and the following points ties some of these principals to the Asp.Net MVC framework:

  1. Make your controllers stateless - this is more of a 'Web performance / scalability' suggestion (as opposed to micro/machine level performance) and a major design decision that would affect your applications future - especially in case it becomes popular or if you need some fault tolerance for example.
    • Do not use Sessions
    • Do not use tempdata - which uses sessions
    • Do not try to 'cache' everything 'prematurely'.
  2. Use Forms Authentication
    • Keep your frequently accessed sensitive data in the authentication ticket
  3. Use cookies for frequently accessed non sensitive information
  4. Make your resources cachable on the web
  5. Compile your Javascript. There is a library to do it as well. (sure there are others too)
  6. Use CDNs - especially for your large media files and so on.
  7. Consider different types of storage for your data eg. files, key/value stores etc. - not only SQL Server
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Thank you Max well +1!! Please, May you explain me 6 in further detail? : ) Adding to list.... –  SDReyes Feb 11 '10 at 17:35
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hi, how can i compile javascript? –  nWorx Feb 11 '10 at 17:37
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It's impossible to not use sessions in ASP.NET MVC given that the core framework relies on them anyway. Obviously you could always argue that not using something would increase performance, but I don't see any major performance difference by using sessions selectively. –  Cat Man Do Feb 11 '10 at 18:04
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@Nissan Fan: I don't use Session directly in my ASP.NET MVC application, but it is needed if you want to use TempData. By default TempData is based on Session, you can write your own TempDataProvider and completely get rid of session. There are many reasons not to use Session, but performance doesn't seem to be most relevant. –  LukLed Feb 11 '10 at 18:15
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Sorry, just put a link to javascript compilation. –  Maxwell Troy Milton King Feb 12 '10 at 10:21

When accessing data via LINQ rely on IQueryable ...

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1106802/why-use-asqueryable-instead-of-list

... and leverge a good Repository pattern:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1223194/loading-subrecords-in-the-repository-pattern

This will optimize data access to ensure only the data needed is loaded and when only it is needed.

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Thank you Nissan, good point +1 –  SDReyes Apr 21 '10 at 14:45

Also if you use NHibernate you can turn on and setup second level cache for queries and add to queries scope and timeout. And there is kick ass profiler for EF, L2S and NHibernate - http://hibernatingrhinos.com/products/UberProf . It will help to tune your queries.

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Thank you again Zihotki +1 ! Adding... adding.. –  SDReyes Feb 12 '10 at 14:53
    
Ayende recently blogged about how EF Profiler helped him tune a sample MVC app: ayende.com/Blog/archive/2010/05/17/… –  Frank Schwieterman May 19 '10 at 21:40

IN addition to all the great info on optimising your app on the server side I'd say you should take a look at YSlow, it's a superb resource for improving site performance on the client side.

This applies to all sites, not just ASP.NET MVC.

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Thank you Steve! +1 Nice tip ; ) –  SDReyes Feb 12 '10 at 14:52

One super easy thing to do is to think asynchronously when accessing the data you want for the page. Whether reading from a web service, file, data base or something else, use the async model as much as possible. While it won't necessarily help any one page be faster it will help your server perform better overall.

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I will also add :

  1. Use Sprites : Sprites is a great thing to reduce request, you merge all your images into a single one and use css to get to good part of the sprite, Microsoft provides a good library to do it : Sprite and Image Optimization Preview 4.

  2. Cache Your server object : If you have some references lists or datas which will change rarely, you can cache them into memory instead of querying database everytime.

  3. Use ADO.Net instead of Entity Freamework : EF4 or EF5 are great to reduce developement time but it will be painfull to optimize. It's more simple to optimize a stored procedure than Entity Framework. So you should use Store procedure as much as possible. Dapper provides a simple way to query and map SQL with very good performance.

  4. Cache Page or partial page: MVC Provides some easy filter to cache page according to some parameters, so use it.

  5. Reduce Database calls: You can create a unique Database Request that return multiple object, check on Dapper website.

  6. Always have a clean architecture: Have a clean n-tiers architecture, even on small project. It will help you to keep your code clean and it will be easier to optimize it if needed.

  7. You can take a look at this template "Neos-SDI MVC Template" which will create for you a clean architecture with lots of performance improvements by default (check MvcTemplate website).

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