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var flow;

$.ajax({
    url: "qa/version.json",
    dataType: "json",
    success: function( response ){ 
        flow = response.Version;
    }
});

$(".flow").append(flow);

Due to the nature of JS asynchronous design, the append would will be execute before it is being assigned a value in ajax call. What is the best way to tell the script to wait until flow gets assigned in ajax call, then do the append? I do not want to put append right below the success, I would like to keep them separate.

share|improve this question
1  
Place $(".flow").append(flow); inside of success funciton – Yuriy Galanter Mar 17 '14 at 19:36
2  
Please explain why you want to keep the success callback and the .append() call separate. Doing so is the correct approach. – Blazemonger Mar 17 '14 at 19:38
    
Also explain why there is a requirement for this to wait until flow is assigned. – Erik Philips Mar 17 '14 at 19:40
    
Because I am not just assigning flow, say if I have 50 other parameters from json to get appended. I just think it's kinda messy, and I like to have all the appends in one place. – Terry Chen Mar 17 '14 at 19:43
    
@TerryChen You can always reference a function by name there... you don't have to physically put the code there. Alternatively, see my answer below for simply adding this as a handler for when the Deferred object is resolved. – Brad Mar 17 '14 at 19:45

The "best way" is to perform the action in response to the asynchronous action:

$.ajax({
    url: "qa/version.json",
    dataType: "json",
    success: function(response){ 
        $(".flow").append(response.Version);
    }
});

If you want to "keep them separate" then you can define a function to call in the response:

var appendFlow = function (flow) {
    $(".flow").append(flow);
};

$.ajax({
    url: "qa/version.json",
    dataType: "json",
    success: function(response){ 
        appendFlow(response.Version);
    }
});

Separating the code into its own function is simply a matter of organizing your code into re-usable components. Either way, by design the response can't be processed until it's received, so you'd perform your actions in response to the asynchronous call.

share|improve this answer

Anything wrong with:

$.ajax({
  url: "qa/version.json",
  dataType: "json",
  success: function( response ){ 
    flow = response.Version;
    $(".flow").append(flow);
  }
});
share|improve this answer
    
He specifically says he doesn't want to do that... but who knows why. – Brad Mar 17 '14 at 19:37
    
Because I am not just assigning flow, say if I have 50 other parameters from json to get appended. I just think it's kinda messy, and I like to have all the appends in one place – Terry Chen Mar 17 '14 at 19:45

I have no idea why you don't want to put your success handler in the spot for a success handler, but here's an alternative that may help you.

jQuery returns a Deferred instance when you make AJAX requests. You can use its .done() method to set up a callback later.

var dfd = $.ajax( /* your code here, without the success handler */);

// later on...
dfd.done(function (response) {
  $('.flow').append(response.Version);
});

See also:

share|improve this answer

Or:

var request = $.ajax({
    url: "qa/version.json",
    dataType: "json"
});

request.done(function(response){
    $(".flow").append(response.Version);
});
share|improve this answer
    
Could you please explain this code in your answer? – The Guy with The Hat Mar 17 '14 at 20:01

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