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Is there an easy way to populate my C# Object with the JSON object passed via AJAX?

//This is the JSON Object passed to C# WEBMETHOD from the page using JSON.stringify

{"user":{"name":"asdf","teamname":"b","email":"c","players":["1","2"]}}

//C# WebMetod That receives the JSON Object

    [WebMethod]
    public static void SaveTeam(Object user)
    {

    }

//C# Class that represents the object structure of JSON Object passed in to the WebMethod

  public class User
  {

    public string name { get; set; }
    public string teamname { get; set; }
    public string email { get; set; }
    public Array players { get; set; }

  }
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18  
Would like to add that you can use json2csharp.com to generate your c# classes for you. Full disclosure: I did create this site. –  JonathanK Apr 18 '11 at 14:07

9 Answers 9

up vote 85 down vote accepted

A good way to use JSON in C# is with JSON.NET

Quick Starts & API Documentation from JSON.NET - Official site help you work with it.

An example of how to use it:

    public class User {
        public User(string json) {
            JObject jObject = JObject.Parse(json);
            JToken jUser = jObject["user"];
            name = (string) jUser["name"];
            teamname = (string) jUser["teamname"];
            email = (string) jUser["email"];
            players = jUser["players"].ToArray();
        }

        public string name { get; set; }
        public string teamname { get; set; }
        public string email { get; set; }
        public Array players { get; set; }
    }
    // Use
    private void Run() {
        string json = @"{""user"":{""name"":""asdf"",
             ""teamname"":""b"",""email"":""c"",""players"":[""1"",""2""]}}";
        User user = new User(json);
        Console.WriteLine("Name : " + user.name);
        Console.WriteLine("Teamname : " + user.teamname);
        Console.WriteLine("Email : " + user.email);
        Console.WriteLine("Players:");
        foreach (var player in user.players)
            Console.WriteLine(player);
     }
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To keep your options open, if you're using .NET 3.5 or later, here is a wrapped up example you can use straight from the framework using Generics. As others have mentioned, if it's not just simple objects you should really use JSON.net.

public static string Serialize<T>(T obj)
{
    DataContractJsonSerializer serializer = new DataContractJsonSerializer(obj.GetType());
    MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream();
    serializer.WriteObject(ms, obj);
    string retVal = Encoding.UTF8.GetString(ms.ToArray());
    return retVal;
}

public static T Deserialize<T>(string json)
{
    T obj = Activator.CreateInstance<T>();
    MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream(Encoding.Unicode.GetBytes(json));
    DataContractJsonSerializer serializer = new DataContractJsonSerializer(obj.GetType());
    obj = (T)serializer.ReadObject(ms);
    ms.Close();
    return obj;
}

You'll need:

using System.Runtime.Serialization;

using System.Runtime.Serialization.Json;
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for adding the using statements... –  Christian Payne Jan 29 '13 at 0:42
    
@ChristianPayne ha! Good point, yes these should be wrapped. With hindsight looking at this, just use JSON.NET! –  Jammin Feb 17 '13 at 19:34
1  
If DataContractJsonSerializer class is not visible, you have to add a reference to System.Runtime.Serialization by right clicking on the References in the solution, select the .NET tab and select System.Runtime.Serialization –  DanKodi Sep 16 '13 at 15:08
    
One scenario where this one breaks. If your JSON object represents properties with single quotes, this function fails. e.g. it was not able to parse {'Subject': 'Emailing: Web User Activity Log11', 'EmbedAsImage': true} but it was able to parse {"Subject": "Emailing: Web User Activity Log11", "EmbedAsImage": true} –  Vishal Kumar Nov 12 '13 at 18:10
    
Plus I needed to decorate my simple class with DataContract and DataMember attributes. It won't parse without it. –  Vishal Kumar Nov 12 '13 at 18:11

Given your code sample, you shouldn't need to do anything else.

If you pass that JSON string to your web method, it will automatically parse the JSON string and create a populated User object as the parameter for your SaveTeam method.

Generally though, you can use the JavascriptSerializer class as below, or for more flexibility, use any of the various Json frameworks out there (Jayrock JSON is a good one) for easy JSON manipulation.

 JavaScriptSerializer jss= new JavaScriptSerializer();
 User user = jss.Deserialize<User>(jsonResponse); 
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1  
I think you must use an ienumerable type (so in this example List<User>) –  Dragouf Sep 19 '11 at 15:18
    
How can we deserialize if it contains sub view model –  SrinivasNaidu Apr 29 at 8:22

The following 2 examples make use of either

  1. JavaScriptSerializer under System.Web.Script.Serialization Or
  2. Json.Decode under System.Web.Helpers

Example 1: using System.Web.Script.Serialization

using Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestTools.UnitTesting;
using System.Web.Script.Serialization;

namespace Tests
{
    [TestClass]
    public class JsonTests
    {
        [TestMethod]
        public void Test()
        {
            var json = "{\"user\":{\"name\":\"asdf\",\"teamname\":\"b\",\"email\":\"c\",\"players\":[\"1\",\"2\"]}}";
            JavaScriptSerializer serializer = new JavaScriptSerializer();
            dynamic jsonObject = serializer.Deserialize<dynamic>(json);

            dynamic x = jsonObject["user"]; // result is Dictionary<string,object> user with fields name, teamname, email and players with their values
            x = jsonObject["user"]["name"]; // result is asdf
            x = jsonObject["user"]["players"]; // result is object[] players with its values
        }
    }
}

Usage: JSON object to Custom C# object

using System;
using Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestTools.UnitTesting;
using System.Web.Script.Serialization;
using System.Linq;

namespace Tests
{
    [TestClass]
    public class JsonTests
    {
        [TestMethod]
        public void TestJavaScriptSerializer()
        {
            var json = "{\"user\":{\"name\":\"asdf\",\"teamname\":\"b\",\"email\":\"c\",\"players\":[\"1\",\"2\"]}}";
            User user = new User(json);
            Console.WriteLine("Name : " + user.name);
            Console.WriteLine("Teamname : " + user.teamname);
            Console.WriteLine("Email : " + user.email);
            Console.WriteLine("Players:");
            foreach (var player in user.players)
                Console.WriteLine(player);
        }
    }

    public class User {
        public User(string json) {
            JavaScriptSerializer serializer = new JavaScriptSerializer();
            var jsonObject = serializer.Deserialize<dynamic>(json);
            name = (string)jsonObject["user"]["name"];
            teamname = (string)jsonObject["user"]["teamname"];
            email = (string)jsonObject["user"]["email"];
            players = jsonObject["user"]["players"];
        }

        public string name { get; set; }
        public string teamname { get; set; }
        public string email { get; set; }
        public Array players { get; set; }
    }
}

Example 2: using System.Web.Helpers

using Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestTools.UnitTesting;
using System.Web.Helpers;

namespace Tests
{
    [TestClass]
    public class JsonTests
    {
        [TestMethod]
        public void TestJsonDecode()
        {
            var json = "{\"user\":{\"name\":\"asdf\",\"teamname\":\"b\",\"email\":\"c\",\"players\":[\"1\",\"2\"]}}";
            dynamic jsonObject = Json.Decode(json);

            dynamic x = jsonObject.user; // result is dynamic json object user with fields name, teamname, email and players with their values
            x = jsonObject.user.name; // result is asdf
            x = jsonObject.user.players; // result is dynamic json array players with its values
        }
    }
}

Usage: JSON object to Custom C# object

using System;
using Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestTools.UnitTesting;
using System.Web.Helpers;
using System.Linq;

namespace Tests
{
    [TestClass]
    public class JsonTests
    {
        [TestMethod]
        public void TestJsonDecode()
        {
            var json = "{\"user\":{\"name\":\"asdf\",\"teamname\":\"b\",\"email\":\"c\",\"players\":[\"1\",\"2\"]}}";
            User user = new User(json);
            Console.WriteLine("Name : " + user.name);
            Console.WriteLine("Teamname : " + user.teamname);
            Console.WriteLine("Email : " + user.email);
            Console.WriteLine("Players:");
            foreach (var player in user.players)
                Console.WriteLine(player);
        }
    }

    public class User {
        public User(string json) {
            var jsonObject = Json.Decode(json);
            name = (string)jsonObject.user.name;
            teamname = (string)jsonObject.user.teamname;
            email = (string)jsonObject.user.email;
            players = (DynamicJsonArray) jsonObject.user.players;
        }

        public string name { get; set; }
        public string teamname { get; set; }
        public string email { get; set; }
        public Array players { get; set; }
    }
}

This code requires adding System.Web.Helpers namespace found in,

%ProgramFiles%\Microsoft ASP.NET\ASP.NET Web Pages{VERSION}\Assemblies\System.Web.Helpers.dll

Or

%ProgramFiles(x86)%\Microsoft ASP.NET\ASP.NET Web Pages{VERSION}\Assemblies\System.Web.Helpers.dll

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer
    
This is a very good answer, but the tricky thing is that with dynamic types, you don't get any true type checking. For example, if your JSON contains "Name" : "Ahmed" and you mistype "Name" in your C# code, it's a runtime error (bleh). –  Jess Jun 5 at 13:11
    
Thanks! Please update the answer to state that for Example 1, you need to reference System.Web.Extensions.dll –  Valamas - AUS Oct 19 at 23:45
    
super great answer, the dynamic typing works w/ json.net v6.0.6 too! –  stackuser83 Nov 20 at 21:55

This is a very handy tool that creates C# object models* from JSON: http://json2csharp.com

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Um - your terminology is a bit off. When I read "C# object" I assumed you meant ".Net object", like it was something done at runtime. But no, what you mean is "C# class source statements". –  RenniePet Jul 22 '13 at 15:42

Using JavaScriptSerializer() is less strict than the generic solution offered : public static T Deserialize(string json)

That might come handy when passing json to the server that does not match exactly the Object definition you are trying to convert to.

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public static class Utilities
{
    public static T Deserialize<T>(string jsonString)
    {
        using (MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream(Encoding.Unicode.GetBytes(jsonString)))
        {    
            DataContractJsonSerializer serializer = new DataContractJsonSerializer(typeof(T));
            return (T)serializer.ReadObject(ms);
        }
    }
}

More information go to following link http://ishareidea.blogspot.in/2012/05/json-conversion.html

About DataContractJsonSerializer Class you can read here.

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JSON.Net is your best bet but, depending on the shape of the objects and whether there are circular dependencies, you could use JavaScriptSerializer or DataContractSerializer.

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The JSON C# class generator on codeplex generates classes which work well with NewtonSoftJS.

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