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How do I calculate the time complexity of the following program?

int[] vars = { 2, 4, 5, 6 };
int len = vars.length;
int[] result = new int[len];

for (int i = 0; i < len; i++) {
    int value = 1;

    for (int k = 0; k < i; k++) {
        value = value * vars[k];
    }
    for (int j = i + 1; j < len; j++) {
        value = value * vars[j];
    }

    result[i] = value;
}

and how is the above one same as below?

for (int i = 0; i < len; i++) {
    int value = 1;

    for (int j = 0; j < len; j++) {
        if(j != i) {
            value = value * vars[j];
        }
    }

    result[i] = value;
}
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is it n( n-1 ) ? –  Abhi Mar 18 '14 at 0:18
    
Not sure why my question was downgraded? –  Abhi Mar 18 '14 at 0:32
    
If you hover over the triangle for downvote it says "This question does not show any research effort". Information about time complexity and how to calculate it is very easy to find and it doesn't seem that you have tried to do that on your own before asking your question here. This is likely why you received a downvote. –  Takendarkk Mar 18 '14 at 0:38
    
Well I did and the confusion was around n*(n-1) and n*n. I have edited the post to include the comparison. –  Abhi Mar 18 '14 at 0:40
1  
Yes there are less iterations, but the time complexity of the algorithm as a whole does not change. Time complexity is just an approximation of how the processing time will change relative to the size of n. –  Takendarkk Mar 18 '14 at 0:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The i for loop is of time complexity O(n), because it performs one iteration for every element of the array. For every element in the array, you are looping through it once more -- half on average in the k for loop, and half on average in the j for loop. Each of these is O(n) as well. If there are 4 elements in the array, the number of operations is proportional to n*(n - 1), but in time-complexity, constants such as the 1 are ignored.

The number of operations your method will perform is proportional to the number of elements in it multiplied by itself, therefore, overall, the method is O(n2).

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For the first fragment:

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For the second fragment:

enter image description here

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A general approach in determining the complexity is counting the iterations. In your example, you have an outer for loop with two loops nested in it. Note: Instead of len, I'll write n. The outer loop

for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)

iterates n-times. The number of iterations of the two next loops are actually more easy to count, than it looks like: The second loop iterates i-times and the third n-i-times. If you add them together you get n-many iterations within the outer loop.

Finally, if the outer loop does n iterations and within each of these iteration the code loops another n times you get the result of n^2 iterations. In the traditional notation of complexity-theory you'd write, that the algorithm has an upper-bound of n^2 or is in O(n).

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Hi Thanks but I think second one will not iterate n times as it will be always be less than n but I guess n^2 is the time complexity as suggested by rgettman –  Abhi Mar 18 '14 at 0:31
    
Oh, sorry. That was a typo on my side. I guess I was two or third words ahead in my thoughts :-). I've corrected it. –  Bengt Mar 18 '14 at 0:33

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