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When class keyword is used, constant lookup is done within that class. In the following, what is assigned to :bar is B::A, not ::A.

A = :foo
class B
  A = :bar
end
A # => :foo

But in method definition, I cannot use the keyword class, and if I use things like class_eval, module_eval, instance_eval, to evaluate a block, then the constant referred to would be evaluated in the main environment as follows.

class B; end
def foo &pr
  B.class_eval(&pr)
end
foo{A = :bar}
A # => :bar

Is there a way to pass a block to a method and have its constant be evaluated within a certain class/module?

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Why not just reference the constant with its intended scope ::A = :bar? Makes it very clear what's going on then. –  Casper Mar 18 at 1:58
    
If you're going through the trouble to change a constant using an instance method, why even bother making a constant? Why not use an instance variable on the class? Or a class method? –  Zach Kemp Mar 18 at 1:59
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2 Answers 2

I think I see what you're asking (though I don't yet understand why you need to). You could yield the class back to the block so at least you're explicit about what is happening:

def foo &pr
  yield self.class
end

my_object.foo {|klass| klass::A = :bar }
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Module#const_set seems to be what you want:

class B; end

def foo(klass, konstant, val)
  klass.const_set(konstant, val)
end

foo(B, "A", :bar)

B::A #=> :bar
A    #=> NameError: uninitialized constant A

...but since you didn't mention it, I expect I've misunderstood the question.

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