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I am in the process of learning Hadoop and stuck with few concepts on moving data from Relational database to Hadoop and vice versa. I have transferred files from MySQL to HDFS using SQOOP import queries. The files I transferred were structured datasets and not any server log data. I recently read that we usually use flume for moving log files into Hadoop, My question is: 1. Can we use SQOOP as well for moving log files? 2. If yes, which of SQOOP or FLUME is more preferred for log files and why?

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3 Answers 3

SQOOP not only transfers data from RDBMS but also from NOSql databases like MongoDB. You can directly transfer data to HDFS or Hive.

Transferring data to Hive you need not have to create table beforehand.. It takes the scheme from database itself.

Flume is used to fetch log data or streaming data

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1) Sqoop can be used to transfer data between any rdbms and hdfs. To use scoop the data has to be structured usually specified by schema of database from where data is being imported or exported.Log files are not always structured,depending on source and type of log so sqoop is not used for moving log files.

2)Flume can collect, aggregate data from many different kinds of customizable data sources. It gives more flexibility in controlling what specific events to capture and use in user defined work flow before storing in say hdfs.

I hope it clarified difference between sqoop and flume.

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Thanks for such an explanation! –  user3344735 Mar 18 at 14:50

SQOOP is designed to transfer data from RDMS to HDFS whereas FLUME is for moving large amounts of log data.

Both are different and specialized for different purposes.

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You can use SQOOP to import data via JDBC ( which you can not do in FLUME ), and You can use FLUME to say something like "I want to tail 200 lines of log file from this server".

Read more about FLUME here http://flume.apache.org/

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