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I've registered a handler that print signal number and then call the original function to SIGINT.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <signal.h>

void (*orifunc)(int);

void func(int sig) {
    printf("signal number is %d. \n", sig);
    orifunc(sig);
    return;
}

int main() {
    orifunc = signal(SIGINT, func);
    while (1);
    return 0;
}

But as I run, after printf executed, it returned a "Segmentation fault: 11". Why did this happen?

Since SIG_DFL is not a real function. I try to code like this:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <signal.h>

void func(int sig) {
    printf("signal number is %d. \n", sig);

    signal(SIGINT, SIG_DFL);
    raise(sig);
    signal(SIGINT, func);
    return;
}

int main() {
    signal(SIGINT, func);
    while (1);
    return 0;
}

Then it runs func recursive and prints strings on the whole screen. How can I run the default handler in my handler correctly?

share|improve this question
2  
what is the value of orifunc()? –  hmjd Mar 18 '14 at 7:40
    
I think it will be 'SIG_DFL'. –  Non-native English Speaker Mar 18 '14 at 7:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Before calling orifunc(), you need to check if it's one of the special handler values, because these aren't real functions. So you need to do:

if(orifunc != SIG_DFL && orifunc != SIG_IGN && orifunc != SIG_HOLD) {
    orifunc(sig);
}

Or you can put back the original handler and re-send it to yourself:

void func(int sig) {
    printf("signal number is %d. \n", sig);
    signal(sig, orifunc);
    raise(sig);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, it is SIG_DFL. But I want the function to kill itself after printf like default. What should I do? –  Non-native English Speaker Mar 18 '14 at 7:55
    
Isn't SIG_DFL a real funtion to run default? –  Non-native English Speaker Mar 18 '14 at 7:57
    
Look in sys/signal.h: #define SIG_DFL (void (*)(int))0 –  Barmar Mar 18 '14 at 7:57
    
What you can do is put back the original signal handler, and then send the signal to yourself again. –  Barmar Mar 18 '14 at 7:59
    
Thanks, i've tried. If there is no signal(SIGINT, func);, it runs correctly. But why after adding this code, it goes wrong? –  Non-native English Speaker Mar 18 '14 at 8:04

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