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I've noticed a common pattern in some recently popular PHP libraries such as Laravel for example, where the API is heavily based on static classes and methods. A typical example of how this sort of API looks:

Logger::note('Handle routes for the welcome area of the site.');
Route::match('/welcome/:id', function ($id) {
    $name = Model::from('users')->get('name')->where('id', $id);
    $body = Template::body('templates/wecome.tpl', array('name' => $name));
    HTTP::respond(200, $body);
}

The code seems nicely readable, and the 5 different static classes are autoloaded by Composer, so at first glance this seems like an attractive pattern to use. My question, for those more experienced in designing APIs, is does this seem like a good approach as things scale up?

For one example, I can immediately see some clunkiness on the horizon, if for example I should want multiple logs to be kept. In a non-static pattern I could do this:

$debugLog = new Logger('logs/debug.log');
$errorLog = new Logger('logs/errors.log');
Route::match('/welcome/:id', function ($id) {
    $debugLog->note('Handle routes for the welcome area of the site.');
    $name = Model::from('users')->get('name')->where('id', $id);
    if (empty($name)) {
        $errorLog->warn('Name is empty!');
    }
}

But this gets difficult to share across many different methods and files.

#file1.php
Route::match('/welcome/:id', function ($id) {
    $debugLog = new Logger('logs/debug.log');
    $debugLog->note('Handle routes for the welcome area of the site.');
    //etc
}
#file2.php
Route::match('/news', function ($id) {
    $debugLog = new Logger('logs/debug.log');
    $debugLog->note('Handle routes for the news area of the site.');
    if ($error) {
        $errorLog = new Logger('logs/errors.log');
        $errorLog->warn('There is some problem: '.$error);
    }
}

Now I am forced to repeat myself in order to instantiate the non-static class all over the place, which clutters up the code at least and arguably makes it harder to maintain.

But, on the other hand, it looks like the every-class-a-static approach doesn't scale easily either. Suppose I want to have multiple logs using the static API; I could try some singletons and factories...

Logger::get('debug')->note('Handle routes for the welcome area of the site.');
Logger::get('errors')->note('Danger!');

But this seems like it is just shifting the API from method names into string arguments (which could be misspelled, etc). And what if I want two different 'debug' loggers?

Either way I lean, static-based on the one side, or instance-based on the other, it seems like I run into limitations as the usage of the pattern grows.

Any advice on the best approach, given that I don't want to have to fill my application with repeated instantiation code, and yet I also want flexibility to grow with more kinds of classes, based on the existing ones?

share|improve this question
1  
Well, you might want to read this : r.je/static-methods-bad-practice.html –  bad_boy Mar 18 '14 at 11:24
    
@djay +1 for that article, it perfectly clarifies why APIs based on statics are inviting, yet ultimately a bad idea. –  Michael Mathews Mar 18 '14 at 14:14
1  
all design patterns, that are base on static classes, have one name: anti-patterns –  tereško Mar 18 '14 at 18:35

1 Answer 1

These static classes in Laravel are actually glorified service locators. "Syntactic sugar" they call "Facade" (not a good name but that is how Taylor calls them, do not confuse it with http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Facade_pattern)

Route::get('/', 'HomeController@showWelcome');

can be written as

$app['router']->get('/', 'HomeController@showWelcome');

read more: http://taylorotwell.com/response-dont-use-facades/

share|improve this answer
    
That's very interesting to know about Laravel. There are other examples; the question could apply to Flight, for example. –  Michael Mathews Mar 18 '14 at 14:56
    
-1: those are NOT facades –  tereško Mar 18 '14 at 18:36
1  
@tereško we all know that, try telling it to the creator of Laravel who calls them so –  Imre L Mar 18 '14 at 18:45

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