Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have problem with regex. I want to match only these words which contains only vowel or consonants.

For example I have strings like this:

aeyiuo 
aeYYuo 
qrcbk 
aeeeee 
normal 
Text 
extTT 

My regex should match: aeyiuo aeYYuo aeeeee

I don't know why my expression doesn't work ^[aeyiuo]*|[^aeyiuo]*$ To check my regexp I use online parsers: http://www.regexr.com/ or http://regexpal.com/

If somebody could explain me my mistake, I would be very grateful.

share|improve this question
1  
^ matches the start of the whole string, not of a word. Similarly, $ matches the end of the string, not the end of a word. How you can reliably match the end of a word depends a bit on which regex engine you are using. Please say which programming language you want to use this with. –  Christian Aichinger Mar 18 at 12:00
    
what sort of output you want from the above string?? –  Amitesh Mar 18 at 12:02
    
Yes, please specify what language you are using. –  emh Mar 18 at 12:03
add comment

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you want to match lines with only vowels then you just need to think about a character class [].
What should we add to it ? Vowels ! [aeiouy].
We need it one or more times, so let's add a plus sign to it [aeiouy]+.
We also need to anchor it ^[aeiouy]+$.
Now let's talk about the modifiers, we need the i modifier to match case insensitive. We also need the m modifier so that ^ and $ will match begin of line and end of line respectively. Also don't forget the g modifier, in some engines you need it to match all occurences.

Online demo

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks for your answer @HamZa, it was very helpful :) –  Araneo Mar 18 at 12:21
add comment

To simplify things why not check against two different expressions?

^[aeyiuo]+$ for only vowels

^[^aeyiuo]+$ for only consonants.

Unless your requirement is to use only one regex. Check for case sensitivity or insensitivity too.

share|improve this answer
    
I must do it in one expression :( unfortunately your solution with + symbol doesn't work. –  Araneo Mar 18 at 11:57
    
This is wrong, see my comment on the question about ^ and $. –  Christian Aichinger Mar 18 at 12:00
    
plus means one or more occurrence of the pattern. star means it may be zero occurrence. so a[ ]*b means a and b separated by zero or more spaces. if you put plus it means atleast one space should be there for match. If you use star, your empty string will also match but it contains no vowels ! –  RuntimeException Mar 18 at 12:02
    
@ChristianAichinger Saw your comment. I assumed each string will have regex applied and will have separate regexes to check for vowel only and consonant only. The accepted answer assumes the same. I find it easier to have simpler and smaller regular expressions, and use code for splitting the string and performing OR operations in code rather than in regex. –  RuntimeException Apr 22 at 10:13
add comment

Your regex now checks if it matches ^[aeyiuo]* or [^aeyiuo]*$ (notice absence of $ in first expression and absence of ^ in second one).

You have two options:

  1. Add parenthesis around both expressions:

    ^([aeyiuo]*|[^aeyiuo]*)$

  2. Add ^ and $ to both expressions

    ^[aeyiuo]*$|^[^aeyiuo]*$

share|improve this answer
add comment

If you want only vowels aeiyou try: \b[aeiyou]+\b.

Only consonants (or any other non-vowel char) would be: \b[^\b\saeiyou]+\b

So you get: \b[aeiyou]+\b|\b[^\b\saeiyou]+\b

which matches: aeyiuo aeYYuo qrcbk aeeeee

It will match qrcbk as well contrary to you example.

I hope I didn't misunderstand...

share|improve this answer
    
Hello and welcome to StackOverflow ! I've formatted your answer to make it more readable but next time try to explore and use StackOverflow's formatting tool. –  HamZa Mar 18 at 12:24
    
Also \b in a character class [\b] will match a backspace (ASCII 8). I don't think you meant that :) –  HamZa Mar 18 at 12:26
    
Thanks! :-) I was wondering about the formatting... –  Bereng Mar 18 at 12:26
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.