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I'm trying to debug the source of a SQL timeout in a web application that I maintain. I have the source code of the C# code behind, so I know exactly what code is running. I have debugged the application right down to the line that executes the SQL code that times out, and I watch the query running in SQL profiler.

When this query executes from the web, it times out after 30 seconds. However, when I cut/paste the query exactly as presented in Profiler, and I put it into SSMS and run it, it returns almost instantly. I have traced the problem to ARITHABORT being set to OFF in the connection that the web is using (that is, if I turn ARITHABORT OFF in the SSMS session, it runs for a long time, and if I turn it back ON then it runs very quickly). However, reading the description of ARITHABORT, it doesn't seem to apply... I'm only doing a simple SELECT, and there is NO arithmetic being performed at all.. just a single INNER JOIN with a WHERE condition:

Why would ARITHABORT OFF be causing this behavior in this context?? Is there any way I can alter the ARITHABORT setting for that connection from SSMS? I'm using SQL Server 2008.

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up vote 22 down vote accepted

So your C# code is sending an ad hoc SQL query to SQL Server, using what method? Have you considered using a stored procedure? That would probably ensure the same performance (at least in the engine) regardless of who called it.

Why? The ARITHABORT setting is one of the things the optimizer looks at when it is determining how to execute your query (more specifically, for plan matching). It is possible that the plan in cache has the same setting as SSMS, so it uses the cached plan, but with the opposite setting your C# code is forcing a recompile (or perhaps you are hitting a really BAD plan in the cache), which can certainly hurt performance in a lot of cases.

If you are already calling a stored procedure (you didn't post your query, though I think you meant to), you can try adding OPTION (RECOMPILE) to the offending query (or queries) in the stored procedure. This will mean those statements will always recompile, but it could prevent the use of the bad plan you seem to be hitting. Another option is to make sure that when the stored procedure is compiled, the batch is executed with SET ARITHABORT ON.

Finally, you seem to be asking how you can change the ARITHABORT setting in SSMS. I think what you meant to ask is how you can force the ARITHABORT setting in your code. If you decide to continue sending ad hoc SQL from your C# app, then of course you can send a command as text that has multiple statements separated by semi-colons, e.g.:

SET ARITHABORT ON; SELECT ...

For more info on why this issue occurs, see Erland Sommarskog's great article:

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The query is actually being generated by an O/R Mapper (LLBLGen) so I don't think I have much control over it. I did search on their forums for ARITHABORT with only a few hits, but it did lead me to turn ARITHABORT ON for the default setting on the server. Not my ideal solution, so I'm still hoping to understand why this setting caused this behavior. I didn't post the query because I don't think it's particularly relevant - I use the EXACT query (cut/paste) in SSMS that was used in the web, so it should be using the same plan, except, as you say, for the ARITHABORT setting. Continued..... – Michael Bray Feb 12 '10 at 12:38
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I also had tried dumping the plan cache with DBCC FREEPROCCACHE but that didn't seem to have any effect - the web continued to be slow. After I set the ARITHABORT setting on the server to ON the problem cleared from the web. I actually was asking how I could affect the setting of the OTHER connection from my SSMS connection, but I don't think that is possible. – Michael Bray Feb 12 '10 at 12:41
    
No comment about using a stored procedure instead of queries generated by an O/R Mapper? Once the O/R Mapper has generated the query, you are certainly free to encapsulate that code in a stored procedure, and then call the stored procedure from your web site code. This just gives you more control over the query and the semantics surrounding the call itself. – Aaron Bertrand Feb 12 '10 at 14:02
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+1 I had the exact same thing. Timeout when run through web app, < 1 sec when run through SMSS. Adding SET ARITHABORT ON to the sproc definition fixed it. Thank you! PS What the hell does it mean? – David May 18 '11 at 14:48
    
@David - Just to be clear ARITHABORT itself isn't the cause and adding SET ARITHABORT ON to the stored proc definition doesn't mean the problem won't re-occur. The issue is parameter sniffing. – Martin Smith Oct 6 '11 at 16:03

This answer includes a way to resolve this issue:

By running the following commands as administrator on the database all queries run as expected regardless of the ARITHABORT setting.

 DBCC DROPCLEANBUFFERS
 DBCC FREEPROCCACHE

Update

It seems that most people end up having this problem occur very rarely, and the above technique is a decent one-time fix. But if a specific query exhibits this problem more than once, a more long-term solution to this problem would be to use Query Hints like OPTIMIZE FOR and OPTION(Recompile), as described in this article.

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I disagree the linked answer is any better than the answer already on this question. – Martin Smith Oct 6 '11 at 16:01
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@MartinSmith: I changed my answer to avoid calling the linked answer a "more full explanation," but I think providing an actual solution that fixes the problem is better than setting ARITHABORT ON (which is just a short-term hack really). The linked question also indicates that the problem can occur equally well on a stored procedure, so just using a stored procedure isn't necessarily going to fix things either. – StriplingWarrior Oct 6 '11 at 16:12
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Flushing the entire procedure cache is not much of a solution TBH it is only a very expensive short term fix. And why on earth are you also running DBCC DROPCLEANBUFFERS? The correct thing to do is to investigate and fix the parameter sniffing problem which means the two execution plans are different. See http://www.sommarskog.se/query-plan-mysteries.html – Martin Smith Oct 6 '11 at 16:19
    
@MartinSmith: That looks like an interesting article. I'll have to read it over. Would you be willing to write up an answer for this question that talks about parameter sniffing, how it applies to queries that aren't part of stored procedures, and how to go about fixing a query that appears to be having this problem? – StriplingWarrior Oct 6 '11 at 17:04

I've had this problem many times before but if you have a stored procedure with the same problem dropping and recreating the stored proc will solve the issue.

It's called parameter sniffing. You need to always localize the parameters in the stored proc to avoid this issue in the future.

I understand this might not be what the original poster wants but might help someone with the same issue.

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Here is a good article that explains parameter sniffing sommarskog.se/query-plan-mysteries.html#otherreasons – weilin8 Feb 23 '13 at 0:44

I had the same problem and it was fixed by executing procedure "WITH RECOMPILE". You can also try using parameter sniffing. My issue was related to SQL cache.

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This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post - you can always comment on your own posts, and once you have sufficient reputation you will be able to comment on any post. – Ilija Dimov Mar 16 '15 at 11:58

If you can change your code to fix parameter sniffing optimize for unknown hint is your best option. If you cannot change your code the best option is exec sp_recompile 'name of proc' which will force only that one stored proc to get a new execution plan. Dropping and recreating a proc would have a similar effect but could cause errors if someone tries to execute the proc while you have it dropped. DBCC FREEPROCCACHE drops all your cached plans which can wreck havoc ok your system up to and including causing lots of timeouts in a heavy transactions production environment. Setting arithabort is not a solution to the problem but is a useful tool for discovering if parameter sniffing is the issue.

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