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I'm trying to use Java's ThreadPoolExecutor class to run a large number of heavy weight tasks with a fixed number of threads. Each of the tasks has many places during which it may fail due to exceptions.

I've subclassed ThreadPoolExecutor and I've overridden the "afterExecute" method which is supposed to provide any uncaught exceptions encountered while running a task. However, I can't seem to make it work.

For example:

public class ThreadPoolErrors extends ThreadPoolExecutor {
    public ThreadPoolErrors() {
        super(  1, // core threads
                1, // max threads
                1, // timeout
                TimeUnit.MINUTES, // timeout units
                new LinkedBlockingQueue() // work queue
        );
    }

    protected void afterExecute(Runnable r, Throwable t) {
        super.afterExecute(r, t);
        if(t != null) {
            System.out.println("Got an error: " + t);
        } else {
            System.out.println("Everything's fine--situation normal!");
        }
    }

    public static void main( String [] args) {
        ThreadPoolErrors threadPool = new ThreadPoolErrors();
        threadPool.submit( 
                new Runnable() {
                    public void run() {
                        throw new RuntimeException("Ouch! Got an error.");
                    }
                }
        );
        threadPool.shutdown();
    }
}

The output from this program is "Everything's fine--situation normal!" even though the only Runnable submitted to the thread pool throws an exception. Any clue to what's going on here?

Thanks!

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5 Answers

up vote 38 down vote accepted

From the docs:

Note: When actions are enclosed in tasks (such as FutureTask) either explicitly or via methods such as submit, these task objects catch and maintain computational exceptions, and so they do not cause abrupt termination, and the internal exceptions are not passed to this method.

When you submit a Runnable, it'll get wrapped in a Future.

Your afterExecute should be something like this:

  protected void afterExecute(Runnable r, Throwable t) {
      super.afterExecute(r, t);
      if (t == null && r instanceof Future<?>) {
        try {
          Future<?> future = (Future<?>) r;
          if (future.isDone())
            future.get();
        } catch (CancellationException ce) {
            t = ce;
        } catch (ExecutionException ee) {
            t = ee.getCause();
        } catch (InterruptedException ie) {
            Thread.currentThread().interrupt(); // ignore/reset
        }
      }
      if (t != null)
               System.out.println(t);
     }
 }
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2  
Thanks, I ended up using this solution. Additionally, in case anyone is interested: others have suggested not subclassing the ExecutorService, but I did anyway because I wanted to monitor tasks as they complete rather than waiting for all of them to terminate and then calling get() on all of the returned Futures. –  Tom Feb 14 '10 at 4:54
1  
Another approach to subclassing the executor is to subclass FutureTask and override its 'done' method –  nos Feb 14 '10 at 9:44
1  
Tom >> Can you please post your sample snippet code where you subclassed ExecutorService to monitor tasks as they complete... –  JAGAMOT Mar 31 '10 at 15:36
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If you want to process exceptions thrown by the task, then it is generally better to use Callable rather than Runnable.

Callable.call() is permitted to throw checked exceptions, and these get propagated back to the calling thread:

Callable task = ...
Future future = executor.submit(task);
try {
   future.get();
} catch (ExecutionException ex) {
   ex.getCause().printStackTrace();
}

If Callable.call() throws an exception, this will be wrapped in an ExecutionException and thrown by Future.get().

This is likely to be much preferable to subclassing ThreadPoolExecutor. It also gives you the opportunity to re-submit the task if the exception is a recoverable one.

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2  
This should be the accepted answer IMHO. –  Timo Nov 12 '13 at 10:14
    
Agreed. This should be the accepted answer. –  Joeblackdev Dec 10 '13 at 16:01
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The explanation for this behavior is right in the javadoc for afterExecute:

Note: When actions are enclosed in tasks (such as FutureTask) either explicitly or via methods such as submit, these task objects catch and maintain computational exceptions, and so they do not cause abrupt termination, and the internal exceptions are not passed to this method.

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Good point--some how I missed this. –  Tom Feb 11 '10 at 22:45
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I'm using VerboseRunnable class from jcabi-log, which swallows all exceptions and logs them. Very convenient, for example:

import com.jcabi.log.VerboseRunnable;
scheduler.scheduleWithFixedDelay(
  new VerboseRunnable(
    Runnable() {
      public void run() { 
        // the code, which may throw
      }
    },
    true // it means that all exceptions will be swallowed and logged
  ),
  1, 1, TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS
);
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Instead of subclassing ThreadPoolExecutor, I would provide it with a ThreadFactory instance that creates new Threads and provides them with an UncaughtExceptionHandler

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1  
I tried this as well, but the uncaughtException method never seems to get called. I believe this is because a worker thread in the ThreadPoolExecutor class is catching the exceptions. –  Tom Feb 11 '10 at 22:41
    
The uncaughtException method is not called because the ExecutorService's submit method is wrapping the Callable/Runnable in a Future; the exception is being captured there. –  Emil Sit May 20 '11 at 18:50
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