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After writing for a long time tons of stuff i've deleted a certain function... CTRL + y couldn't save me. basically i had:

def foo(todo):
    print 'how why where'

in a .py file, i have deleted function and its is not traceable from the file. Since ipython ran the function, and interpreter is still live, is there a way to watch the history of the interpreter running the function? I managed to find the function name by the command:

history

also from Export Python interpreter history to a file?:

import atexit
import os
import readline
import rlcompleter

historyPath = os.path.expanduser("~/.pyhistory")

def save_history(historyPath=historyPath):
    import readline
    readline.write_history_file(historyPath)

if os.path.exists(historyPath):
    readline.read_history_file(historyPath)

atexit.register(save_history)
del os, atexit, readline, rlcompleter, save_history, historyPath

but it also the same as plain history The real question is where is the history, or trace, from which python can relaunch a function even if the file was deleted as long as the session of the interpreter is alive. I can run the function again & again, because it is complied somewhere.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
It's not exactly clear what you're asking to me. Do you mean that when you run Python in the interpreter, you'd like a more complete history? iPython or bPython or whatever alternate interpreter has very good history tracking, where in IPython you can use the In dictionary for the inputs you've given, and the Out dict for the output. –  TankorSmash Mar 18 '14 at 14:38
    
Do you mean, you want your text editor to be able to revert to previous versions of a file? Consider using source control such as Git/Mercurial/etc. –  Kevin Mar 18 '14 at 14:40
    
hi TankorSmash, i have added a more detailed explanation of the problem. So the problem is not to find the command but the whole function that was ran. –  user2627775 Mar 18 '14 at 14:50
    
Best is using a Revision Control System –  FallenAngel Mar 18 '14 at 15:05
1  
You can get the intermediate code with the dis module. (dis.dis(func)) but its not exactly the python, but you should be able reconstruct it from that if you need to. –  cmd Mar 18 '14 at 15:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

All you have available at this point is the compiled code. You can disassemble that into a readable byte code listing, and that may help you to reconstruct the original source. It will be hard work, because the byte codes are quite low level, but it may be better than nothing.

import dis
dis.disassemble(foo.__code__)

The result looks like this:

  2           0 LOAD_CONST               1 ('how why where')
              3 PRINT_ITEM          
              4 PRINT_NEWLINE       
              5 LOAD_CONST               0 (None)
              8 RETURN_VALUE        
share|improve this answer
    
well it placed me on the right path :) thanks! –  user2627775 Mar 18 '14 at 16:11

Use PyCharm, backup your files and use a Revision Control System such as hg, git or svn. PyCharm saves your local history so you will be able to restore deleted lines. With hg, git or svn you can see previous versions of your files and revert changes. And backup your files at least once a day with tar (or with zip).

share|improve this answer
    
The problem is not from a day before there for backup is not a viable solution at this moment. PyCharm might be a good idea for the future. The real question is where is the history, or trace, from which python can relaunch a function even if the file was deleted as long as the session of the interpreter is alive. I can run the function again & again, because it is complied somewhere. –  user2627775 Mar 18 '14 at 15:05
    
-1 for Use PyCharm - everybody knows you need to use vim. But seriously, this is not an answer but only a well-meaning, subjective suggestion based on hindsight. It does nothing to help with OPs actual problem. –  l4mpi Mar 18 '14 at 15:13

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