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I'm trying to use a CSS3 (webkit) drop-shadow filter to place a white glow around any given transparent png with approximately the same dimensions, and -webkit-filter: drop-shadow(0px 0px 22px rgba(255,255,255,0.8)); is working great for solid images. The problem is that it mangles images that are primarily text somewhat horribly. All the shadows blend together instead of creating a proper tight glow effect.

enter image description here

I need to be able to use spread instead of blur so that the shadows don't just become a big blob behind some of the text, but apparently while the standard says that you should be able to specify a spread property, you still can't.

I've heard that SVG drop shadow filter can be used to achieve the same effect as drop-shadow (and in fact must be used in Firefox) but I haven't been able to find a way to apply a spread property to that either.

What kind of workarounds exist for this problem, if any?

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I would suggest not using images for text. Use actual text and then text-shadow. This would also be good for SEO purposes. –  Paulie_D Mar 18 '14 at 17:07
    
I'm being supplied rather complicated logos to apply these drop shadows to, usually composites of several different fonts, sometimes with other images overlaid. As much better as it would work, recreating them in HTML is not an option. Just baking the shadows into the pngs (although it was my first response) is also not an option. –  rwollr Mar 18 '14 at 17:16
    
I wrote a codepen tool to help people do advanced shadow manipulation using SVG filters - enjoy codepen.io/mullany/details/sJopz –  Michael Mullany Jan 27 at 21:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Well, I figured out how to replace the non-functioning spread property using SVG filters. Big thanks to Michael Mullany though his answer wasn't 100% what I need. Here's the filter I'm using:

<filter id="drop-shadow">
    <feMorphology operator="dilate" radius="6" in="SourceAlpha" result="dilated"/>

    <feGaussianBlur stdDeviation="3" in="dilated" result="blurred"/>

    <feFlood flood-color="rgba(255,255,255,0.5)" in="blurred" result="flooded"/>

    <feMerge>
        <feMergeNode/>
        <feMergeNode in="SourceGraphic"/>
    </feMerge>
</filter>

feMorphology dilate operator replicates the functionality I wanted very nicely, making it easier to give the text a 'glow' effect that conforms a lot more strictly to the outline of the text.

enter image description here

(Oddly, feFlood does nothing and I'm unable to get a white glow, but that's a problem for another question. The filter also eats up 100% of a single core as long as it's open in a tab in the latest Chrome. Oh well.)

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Yes, you can use an SVG filter to customize your shadow spread:

  <filter id="f1" x="-20%" y="-20%" width="160%" height="160%">
    <feGaussianBlur in="SourceAlpha" result="blurOut" stdDeviation="8"/>
    <feOffset in="blurOut" result="dropBlur" dx="0" dy="0"/>

  <feComponentTransfer in="dropBlur" result="dropBlur2">
    <feFuncA id="alphaFunc" type="gamma" amplitude="2" exponent="1.5" offset="0"/>
  </feComponentTransfer>

    <feComposite operator="over" 
     in="SourceGraphic" in2="dropBlur2"/>
</filter>

Interactive demo here: http://codepen.io/mullany/pen/fdkmI

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Drop shadow on text (with your 22px) will never look good, as the text and letter spacing are much closer. If using text, you should use text-shadow (or maybye text-stroke is also an alternative for you, see my demo):

http://jsfiddle.net/fHzX7/

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See comment above. I'd love to, but the image I supplied was just using simple text as a placeholder. The actual "mostly text images" are complicated logos that I can't easily recreate. –  rwollr Mar 18 '14 at 17:21
    
What about using less distance (for example drop-shadow(0px 0px 5px white) instead of drop-shadow(0px 0px 22px white) ? Otherwise this is impossible. There is backface-visibility:hidden but this only works (correctly) in Firefox so far (for drop-shadow) –  Paranoia Mar 18 '14 at 17:32
    
I see. I suppose it doesn't look awful currently but I was definitely hoping I could find some way to force a spread-like property. Thanks for the help anyway. –  rwollr Mar 18 '14 at 17:34

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