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In my C++11 program, I use shared_ptr<T> for some objects which are actively created and deleted. It so happened that standard allocator with operator new is a bottleneck, so I want to create my own one, which will allocate a bunch of memory at once and then give to to make_shared on demand. Unfortunatelly, this is the first time I write an allocator and I have no idea why GCC is unable to compile the following code:

#include <memory>

class MyAlloc {
public:
  typedef char* pointer;
  typedef const char* const_pointer;
  typedef char value_type;

  char* allocate(size_t len) {
    return new char[len];
  }

  void deallocate(char *ptr) {
    delete[] ptr;
  }
} my_alloc;

int main() {
  std::allocator_traits<MyAlloc>();
  // MyAlloc is a correct allocator, since allocator_traits can be instantiated
  // If I comment the following line of code, compilation is successful
  std::allocate_shared<int>(my_alloc, 0);
  return 0;
}

Here I have very simple stub allocator and one call to allocate_shared. The error GCC produces is:

In file included from c:\soft\mingw\lib\gcc\mingw32\4.8.1\include\c++\ext\alloc_traits.h:36:0,
                 from c:\soft\mingw\lib\gcc\mingw32\4.8.1\include\c++\bits\stl_construct.h:61,
                 from c:\soft\mingw\lib\gcc\mingw32\4.8.1\include\c++\memory:64,
                 from a.cpp:1:
c:\soft\mingw\lib\gcc\mingw32\4.8.1\include\c++\bits\alloc_traits.h: In substitution of 'template<class _Alloc> template<class _Tp> using rebind_traits = std::allocator_traits<typename std::__alloctr_rebind<_Alloc, _Tp>::__type> [with _Tp = std::_Sp_counted_ptr_inplace<int, MyAlloc, (__gnu_cxx::_Lock_policy)2u>; _Alloc = MyAlloc]':
c:\soft\mingw\lib\gcc\mingw32\4.8.1\include\c++\bits\shared_ptr_base.h:517:33:   required from 'std::__shared_count<_Lp>::__shared_count(std::_Sp_make_shared_tag, _Tp*, const _Alloc&, _Args&& ...) [with _Tp = int; _Alloc = MyAlloc; _Args = {int}; __gnu_cxx::_Lock_policy _Lp = (__gnu_cxx::_Lock_policy)2u]'
c:\soft\mingw\lib\gcc\mingw32\4.8.1\include\c++\bits\shared_ptr_base.h:986:35:   required from 'std::__shared_ptr<_Tp, _Lp>::__shared_ptr(std::_Sp_make_shared_tag, const _Alloc&, _Args&& ...) [with _Alloc = MyAlloc; _Args = {int}; _Tp = int; __gnu_cxx::_Lock_policy _Lp = (__gnu_cxx::_Lock_policy)2u]'
c:\soft\mingw\lib\gcc\mingw32\4.8.1\include\c++\bits\shared_ptr.h:316:64:   required from 'std::shared_ptr<_Tp>::shared_ptr(std::_Sp_make_shared_tag, const _Alloc&, _Args&& ...) [with _Alloc = MyAlloc; _Args = {int}; _Tp = int]'
c:\soft\mingw\lib\gcc\mingw32\4.8.1\include\c++\bits\shared_ptr.h:598:39:   required from 'std::shared_ptr<_Tp1> std::allocate_shared(const _Alloc&, _Args&& ...) [with _Tp = int; _Alloc = MyAlloc; _Args = {int}]'
a.cpp:19:40:   required from here
c:\soft\mingw\lib\gcc\mingw32\4.8.1\include\c++\bits\alloc_traits.h:204:66: error: invalid use of incomplete type 'struct std::__alloctr_rebind<MyAlloc, std::_Sp_counted_ptr_inplace<int, MyAlloc, (__gnu_cxx::_Lock_policy)2u>, false>'
         using rebind_traits = allocator_traits<rebind_alloc<_Tp>>;
                                                                  ^
c:\soft\mingw\lib\gcc\mingw32\4.8.1\include\c++\bits\alloc_traits.h:65:12: error: declaration of 'struct std::__alloctr_rebind<MyAlloc, std::_Sp_counted_ptr_inplace<int, MyAlloc, (__gnu_cxx::_Lock_policy)2u>, false>'
     struct __alloctr_rebind;
            ^

Why does this happen? How do I write allocators correctly so that they work with allocate_shared? I know that there are some other operators and type traits that are to be supported by allocator, but I cannot see any hint about what does GCC want from me.

Also, is it OK to use char as value_type for this particular allocator (in conjunction with shared_ptr) or something like void or shared_ptr<T>::some_weird_stuff is preferrable?

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1  
You need to provide a rebind member template (and some other stuff). See [allocator.requirements], or cppreference: Allocator requirements –  dyp Mar 18 at 18:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Like this.. You need it templated, you need the rebind and the types and the allocate and deallocate members. It is also nice to have the operators..

#include <memory>

template<typename T>
struct Allocator
{
    typedef std::size_t size_type;
    typedef std::ptrdiff_t difference_type;
    typedef T* pointer;
    typedef const T* const_pointer;
    typedef T& reference;
    typedef const T& const_reference;
    typedef T value_type;

    template<typename U>
    struct rebind {typedef Allocator<U> other;};

    Allocator() throw() {};
    Allocator(const Allocator& other) throw() {};

    template<typename U>
    Allocator(const Allocator<U>& other) throw() {};

    template<typename U>
    Allocator& operator = (const Allocator<U>& other) { return *this; }
    Allocator<T>& operator = (const Allocator& other) { return *this; }
    ~Allocator() {}

    pointer allocate(size_type n, const void* hint = 0)
    {
        return static_cast<T*>(::operator new(n * sizeof(T)));
    }

    void deallocate(T* ptr, size_type n)
    {
        ::operator delete(ptr);
    }
};

template <typename T, typename U>
inline bool operator == (const Allocator<T>&, const Allocator<U>&)
{
    return true;
}

template <typename T, typename U>
inline bool operator != (const Allocator<T>& a, const Allocator<U>& b)
{
    return !(a == b);
}


int main()
{
    std::allocate_shared<int, Allocator<int>>(Allocator<int>(), 0);
}

At the very LEAST, an allocator could look like:

template<typename T>
struct Allocator
{
    typedef T value_type;

    Allocator() noexcept {};

    template<typename U>
    Allocator(const Allocator<U>& other) throw() {};

    T* allocate(std::size_t n, const void* hint = 0)
    {
        return static_cast<T*>(::operator new(n * sizeof(T)));
    }

    void deallocate(T* ptr, size_type n)
    {
        ::operator delete(ptr);
    }
};

template <typename T, typename U>
inline bool operator == (const Allocator<T>&, const Allocator<U>&)
{
    return true;
}

template <typename T, typename U>
inline bool operator != (const Allocator<T>& a, const Allocator<U>& b)
{
    return !(a == b);
}

This will also work for allocate_shared.. However, being the type of person I am, I prefer to have all the functions.. Even the ones not required/used by said container/function.

share|improve this answer
    
Most of those members can be omitted and allocator_traits will provide sensible defaults. Even your "at the very LEAST" version has unnecessary types, rebind is not needed, size_type and pointer are only needed because you use them yourself, and the implicitly-defined copy constructor is fine. –  Jonathan Wakely Mar 18 at 18:11
    
Thank you for that. I realized that after posting. I basically copied my allocator for pre-C++11 and modified it a bit. I provided a minimal allocator just now in my latest edit. I think your answer is better and more suitable as its more descriptive than mine. –  Brandon Mar 18 at 18:12
    
@CantChooseUsernames No, you didn't. But you're getting closer. size_type, pointer, and rebind are equivalent to the defaults provided by std::allocator_traits, and operator == and operator != are required. (i.e., look at Jonathan's answer ;) –  Casey Mar 18 at 18:14
    
What did I miss :S == and != aren't 100% required? The code compiles fine without them for most containers (except std::list) in gcc 4.8.1. pointer, and size_type are required here and not default because the functions allocate and deallocate use them –  Brandon Mar 18 at 18:15
    
I'll edit the post for absolute minimum then.. –  Brandon Mar 18 at 18:21

Your custom allocator does not meet the C++ Allocator requirements.

In particular, it does not support being rebound to allocate objects of a different type. Usually allocators are templates, parameterized on the type they allocate memory for. allocate_shared needs to rebind the allocator so it can allocate a block of memory of the appropriate size and type, it does not want to allocate an array of char objects.

// MyAlloc is a correct allocator, since allocator_traits can be instantiated

This is not a correct assumption. Instantiating allocator_traits<MyAlloc> does not instantiate all its members.

Also, is it OK to use char as value_type for this particular allocator

That makes your allocator an allocator of char, but allocate_shared needs an allocator of some_internal_type_defined_by_the_library and so it tries to use std::allocator_traits<MyAlloc>::rebind_alloc<some_internal_type_defined_by_the_library> to get an allocator for that type, but your allocator does not support the rebind requirement.

If your allocator is a template of the form MyAlloc<T> then allocator_traits can determine how to rebind it to MyAlloc<U>, otherwise the type MyAlloc::rebind<U>::other needs to be valid.

The C++ standard shows the following as an example of an allocator supporting the minimum requirements for a C++ Allocator type:


template <class Tp>
struct SimpleAllocator {
  typedef Tp value_type;
  SimpleAllocator(ctor args);
  template <class T> SimpleAllocator(const SimpleAllocator<T>& other);
  Tp* allocate(std::size_t n);
  void deallocate(Tp* p, std::size_t n);
};
template <class T, class U>
bool operator==(const SimpleAllocator<T>&, const SimpleAllocator<U>&);
template <class T, class U>
bool operator!=(const SimpleAllocator<T>&, const SimpleAllocator<U>&);
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the detailed description! –  yeputons Mar 18 at 18:08

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