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This seems a fairly large topic. For example if you try and cast(convert) a -ve float to a +ve unsigned int it doesn't work. So I am now reading about two's complement, promotion and bit patterns, and how you convert/deal with -ve to +ve float/integers. For example x stays as -1 in the example on VS 2010.

float x = -1;
(unsigned int)y = (unsigned int)x;
printf("y:%u", y);

So how exactly are negative integers stored in memory in terms of bit patterns, what options in C++ are there for converting them, can you do this via bit shifting, what is the best way to do this.

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2  
%d prints signed integers. Use %u for unsigned. –  zch Mar 18 at 18:02
    
For integers. -i = ~i + 1. I'm not sure about floating point as I am not very familiar with the IEEE standard. –  clcto Mar 18 at 18:06

3 Answers 3

So how exactly are negative integers stored in memory in terms of bit patterns

To get some better understanding of the representation of negative integer values, use the following code to play with it:

#include <iostream>
#include <bitset>
#include <cstdint>

void printBitWise(std::ostream& os, uint8_t* data, size_t size) {
    for(size_t i = 0; i < size; ++i) {
        for(uint8_t j = 0; j < 8; ++j) {
            if((data[i] >> j) & 1) {
                os << '1';
            }
            else {
                os << '0';
            }
        }
    }
}

int main() {
    int x = -1;
    std::bitset<sizeof(int) * 8> bitwise1(x);   
    std::cout << bitwise1.to_string() << std::endl;

    int y = -2;
    std::bitset<sizeof(int) * 8> bitwise2(y);
    std::cout << bitwise2.to_string() << std::endl;

    float a = -1;
    printBitWise(std::cout,reinterpret_cast<uint8_t*>(&a),sizeof(float));
    std::cout << std::endl;

    double b = -1;
    printBitWise(std::cout,reinterpret_cast<uint8_t*>(&b),sizeof(double));
    std::cout << std::endl;

    float c = -2;
    printBitWise(std::cout,reinterpret_cast<uint8_t*>(&c),sizeof(float));
    std::cout << std::endl;

    double d = -2;
    printBitWise(std::cout,reinterpret_cast<uint8_t*>(&d),sizeof(double));
    std::cout << std::endl;

    return 0;
}

Output:

11111111111111111111111111111111
11111111111111111111111111111110
00000000000000000000000111111101
0000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000111111111101
00000000000000000000000000000011
0000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000011

The bit format of float and double values is a different story. It's described with the IEEE floating point format, and may be compiler implementation specific regarding specific behaviors (e.g. 'rounding rules' or 'operations').

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In your program, the variable x is of float type. The machine need to convert it to integer type. For intel processors, the instruction is "cvttss2si". Please check http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Single-precision_floating-point_format to see how float is represented in the binary format.

For the code snippt that you gave out, I tested with g++ and VS 2013. Both works as expected and prints "y:-1".

#include <cstdio>

int main()   
{
    float x = -1;
    unsigned int y;
    y = (unsigned int)x;
    printf("y:%d", y);
    return 0;
}

However, in this program, the compiler does the float to integer conversion for us.

movl    $-1, %eax
movl    %eax, -12(%rbp)
movl    -12(%rbp), %esi
movb    $0, %al
callq   _printf

The following sample program can reveal how the machine does the float to integer conversion:

#include <cstdio>

int main()
{
    float x ;
    scanf("%f", &x);

    unsigned int y;
    y = (unsigned int)x;
    printf("y:%d", y);
    return 0;
}

Here is the assembly show that cvttss2si does the float to integer conversion work (http://www.jaist.ac.jp/iscenter-new/mpc/altix/altixdata/opt/intel/vtune/doc/users_guide/mergedProjects/analyzer_ec/mergedProjects/reference_olh/mergedProjects/instructions/instruct32_hh/vc68.htm).

cvttss2si   -8(%rbp), %rsi
movl    %esi, %ecx
movl    %ecx, -12(%rbp)
movl    -12(%rbp), %esi
movq    -24(%rbp), %rdi         ## 8-byte Reload
movl    %eax, -28(%rbp)         ## 4-byte Spill
movb    $0, %al
callq   _printf
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1  
The assembly code is nice to see, but doesn't give so much insight about the actually underlying data format :( ... –  πάντα ῥεῖ Mar 18 at 18:38

On many platforms, the sign of a number is indicated by a reserved bit.

With two's complement integers, the Most Significant Bit (MSB) indicates the sign, when set the value is negative, when clear, the value is positive. However, setting the bit may not correctly convert the value from positive to negative.

In many floating point formats, there is a bit reserved to indicate the sign of the number. You'll have to research the various floating point standard formats, especially the ones used by your platform and compiler.

The best and most portable method to convert from negative numbers to positive is to use the abs family of functions. Remember, this is with signed data types.

To convert from positive to negative, multiply by -1 or -1.0.

Negative numbers are not defined for the unsigned types.

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