Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I can't get to do what I want. I only want accounts for non-international representatives. But when I call ActiveAccounts(), I'm not getting null, I'm getting an enumerable, which then includes null. What am I doing wrong here? Help please.

public static class AccountExt
{
    public static IEnumerable<Account> ActiveAccounts( this AccountRep rep )
    {
        if( rep == null )
            throw new ArgumentNullException();
        if( rep.IsInternational )
            yield return null;

        foreach( var acc in rep.FetchAccounts() )
        {
            if( acc.IsActive )
                yield return acc;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Well, there's a couple of things going on here.

First, you don't just have an extension method, you have an extension method iterator block - that's what you get when you use yield return to automatically implement the IEnumerable<> contract.

It sounds like what you want to have happen is for ActiveAccounts() to return a null IEnumerable<Account>. What's actually happening is that for international reps you are returning null as the first element of the IEnumerable. I suspect that you may have tried using return null there but got a compiler error something like:

Error: Cannot return a value from an iterator. Use the yield return statement to return a value, or yield break to end the iteration.

If what you intended is for the enumerable to be empty, what you want is yield break instead of yield return null. It's actually a better idea, generally, to return an empty sequence, as it allows the caller to avoid checking the return value. It also player nicer with technologies like LINQ, which use composition to assemble complex queries.

The second issue is that the if( rep == null ) precondition is not evaluated when you call ActiveAccounts(), but rather when you begin to enumerate the result of that call. That's probably not what you want - I'd imagine you want the precondition evaluated immediately.

The way you resolve both these problems is to use a two-stage implementation:

public static class AccountExt
{
   // apply preconditions, return null for international reps
   public static IEnumerable<Account> ActiveAccounts( this AccountRep rep )
   {
       if( rep == null )
           throw new ArgumentNullException( "rep" );
       if( rep.IsInternational )
           return null;
       // otherwise...
       return ActiveAccountsImpl( rep );
   }

   // private implementation handles returning active accounts
   private static IEnumerable<Account> ActiveAccountsImpl( AccountRep rep )
   {
       foreach( acc in rep.FetchAccounts() )
       {
           if( acc.IsActive )
               yield return acc;
       }
   }
}

If you're willing to use LINQ, to can avoid the Impl version of the function:

   public static IEnumerable<Account> ActiveAccounts( this AccountRep rep )
   {
       if( rep == null )
           throw new ArgumentNullException( "rep" );
       if( rep.IsInternational )
           return null;
       // otherwise, using LINQ to filter the accounts...
       return rep.FetchAccounts().Where( acc => acc.IsActive );
   }

You can learn more about how iterator blocks here.

share|improve this answer

You should replace yield return null with yield break. That will give back an empty sequence.

If you really want to return null instead of an IEnumerable then LBushkin's answer is the one you want; however, it's more common practice to return an empty sequence, as it doesn't require the consumer to have to check the return value.

share|improve this answer
    
Exactly. I hate it when a function that returns any type of enumerable returns null. Its messy to code against. –  Jason Jackson Feb 12 '10 at 0:26
    
Even with yield break, the OP may want to split the method into two so that the precondition is evaluated immediately, rather than when the enumerator is iterated over. That can result in an unexpected exception far removed from the actual point of failure. –  LBushkin Feb 12 '10 at 0:29
    
I need ActiveAccounts() to return null. Empty enumrable is not what I need, so will yield break work? –  msophie Feb 12 '10 at 0:31
    
@LBushkin: This is correct, but IMO the precondition is unnecessary here. It's only checking the this argument, and you don't really need to guard against that; not checking will simply result in a NullReferenceException which would be the exact same as if you tried to invoke a real (non-extension method). It ought to be the caller's responsibility not to try to invoke any method - extension or no - on a null reference. Nevertheless, your answer is technically correct, and I did call that out. :) –  Aaronaught Feb 12 '10 at 0:35
    
@msophie: No, yield break will not actually return a null reference, it will return an IEnumerable<Account> with no elements. I think that it is poor practice to return null in this case, but if you absolutely must, you need LBushkin's answer. –  Aaronaught Feb 12 '10 at 0:36

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.