Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm hoping that there's a relatively simple way to rotate a webpage a little bit, 30 degrees or so, while still leaving it fully functional and usable.

I completely control the page, and can modify it to make this easier if needed. I'd rather not re-write the whole thing in SVG, though, but perhaps javascript and canvas will work?

Is there a way using CSS, Javascript, or some other cross browser method that would allow me to accomplish this?

share|improve this question
    
For the inevitable "Why?!", April fools day is not far off, and my customers can use a little humor in their day. –  Adam Davis Feb 12 '10 at 0:37
13  
utterly useless +1 –  Eric Feb 12 '10 at 0:40
3  
180 degrees sound more fun ;) –  Gaby aka G. Petrioli Feb 12 '10 at 1:37
4  
I get all kinds of requests like these (i work in online advertisment & rich media). I can see this could be cool if used properly. –  sthg Feb 12 '10 at 1:38
2  
This question and both answers are made of EPIC. (I actually can see legitimate uses for these, primarily in effects like scattered photos, etc.) –  John Rudy Feb 12 '10 at 14:22

6 Answers 6

up vote 36 down vote accepted

Here's another solution based on the matrix filter which works in IE.

http://www.boogdesign.com/examples/transforms/matrix-calculator.html

The css for -30 degrees would be:

.rotate
{
  -ms-filter: "progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.Matrix(M11=0.86602540, M12=0.50000000, M21=-0.50000000, M22=0.86602540,sizingMethod='auto expand')";
  filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.Matrix(M11=0.86602540, M12=0.50000000, M21=-0.50000000, M22=0.86602540,sizingMethod='auto expand');
  -moz-transform:  matrix(0.86602540, -0.50000000, 0.50000000, 0.86602540, 0, 0);
  -webkit-transform:  matrix(0.86602540, -0.50000000, 0.50000000, 0.86602540, 0, 0);
  -o-transform:  matrix(0.86602540, -0.50000000, 0.50000000, 0.86602540, 0, 0);
}

Test page example:

<html>
  <head>
    <style type="text/css" media="screen">
    body {
      -ms-filter: "progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.Matrix(M11=0.86602540, M12=0.50000000, M21=-0.50000000, M22=0.86602540,sizingMethod='auto expand')";
      filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.Matrix(M11=0.86602540, M12=0.50000000, M21=-0.50000000, M22=0.86602540,sizingMethod='auto expand');
      -moz-transform:  matrix(0.86602540, -0.50000000, 0.50000000, 0.86602540, 0, 0);
      -webkit-transform:  matrix(0.86602540, -0.50000000, 0.50000000, 0.86602540, 0, 0);
      -o-transform:  matrix(0.86602540, -0.50000000, 0.50000000, 0.86602540, 0, 0);
    }
    </style>
  </head>
  <body>
    <p>Testing</p>
    <p><a href="http://www.boogdesign.com/examples/transforms/matrix-calculator.html">Matrix calculator here</a></p>
  </body>
</html>

For more information on calculating the matrix cooridinates see:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms533014(VS.85).aspx http://www.boogdesign.com/b2evo/index.php/2009/09/04/element-rotation-ie-matrix-filter?blog=2

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Awesome link Joel. Thanks! –  Doug Neiner Feb 12 '10 at 1:26
    
Thanks for the cross browser code, this is much more than I expected! –  Adam Davis Feb 12 '10 at 3:05
    
@Joel, and you come from behind for the win :) I wonder, could you have just used the ms and opera stuff, and then gone with the simpler -webkit-transform: rotate and -moz-transform: rotate or is there a benefit to doing it this way? –  Doug Neiner Feb 12 '10 at 4:46
1  
@Doug, your suggestion set me looking for this, before that I didn't know you could rotate an element with plain css. Certainly the rotate could be used instead of matrix on Mozilla and Webkit, however, IE has a different origin than all the others, so to make it pixel perfect may require manipulating -moz-transform-origin. –  Joel Potter Feb 12 '10 at 14:32
1  
@Joel right on man, like I said, awesome link. Will be using for sure. I have used the less cross browser solution for tipping photos a bit here and there, so this will make it way better. Thanks! –  Doug Neiner Feb 12 '10 at 14:42

Hey Adam, this will handle it for newer versions of Firefox and Safari:

body {
    -webkit-transform: rotate(-30deg);
    -moz-transform: rotate(-30deg);
}

For Internet Explorer you could look into something like Transformie, or read the documentation for the matrix filter for IE.

share|improve this answer
13  
+1... Try this in Firebug: document.body.style.MozTransform = 'rotate(-30deg)'; (instant gratification) –  Daniel Vassallo Feb 12 '10 at 0:47
2  
I don't think that I can describe how happy this makes me. I am going to browse all my websites at a 30 degree angle from now on. –  Kzqai Feb 12 '10 at 0:53
2  
@Tchalvak Take this knowledge and use it to rotate a photo about 2 degrees, or a few sentences to look like a post-it note. :) –  Doug Neiner Feb 12 '10 at 0:56
2  
@viksit Chrome uses the -webkit command. For a silly example, here is my home page rotated 10 degrees (in FF and Chrome/Safari): pixelgraphics.us/test/rotate.html –  Doug Neiner Feb 12 '10 at 1:17
2  
You should add '-o-transform: rotate(-30deg)' and 'transform: rotate(-30deg)' too. –  Erik Dahlström Feb 12 '10 at 7:44
<script language="JavaScript1.2">

var howOften = 5; //number often in seconds to rotate
var current = 0; //start the counter at 0
var ns6 = document.getElementById&&!document.all; //detect netscape 6

// place your images, text, etc in the array elements here
var items = new Array();
    items[0]="<a href='link.htm' ><img alt='image0 (9K)' src=' /Images/image0.jpg' height='300' width='300' border='0' /></a>"; //a linked image
    items[1]="<a href='link.htm'><img alt='image1 (9K)' src='/Images/image1.jpg' height='300' width='300' border='0' /></a>"; //a linked image
    items[2]="<a href='link.htm'><img alt='image2 (9K)' src='/Images/image2.jpg' height='300' width='300' border='0' /></a>"; //a linked image
   items[3]="<a href='link.htm'><img alt='image3 (9K)' src='/Images/image3.jpg' height='300' width='300' border='0' /></a>"; //a linked image
    items[4]="<a href='link.htm'><img alt='image4 (9K)' src='/Images/image4.jpg' height='300' width='300' border='0' /></a>"; //a linked image
    items[5]="<a href='link.htm'><img alt='image5 (18K)' src='/Images/image5.jpg' height='300' width='300' border='0' /></a>"; //a linked image
function rotater() {
    document.getElementById("placeholder").innerHTML = items[current];
    current = (current==items.length-1) ? 0 : current + 1;
    setTimeout("rotater()",howOften*1000);
}

function rotater() {
    if(document.layers) {
        document.placeholderlayer.document.write(items[current]);
        document.placeholderlayer.document.close();
    }
    if(ns6)document.getElementById("placeholderdiv").innerHTML=items[current]
        if(document.all)
            placeholderdiv.innerHTML=items[current];

    current = (current==items.length-1) ? 0 : current + 1; //increment or reset
    setTimeout("rotater()",howOften*1000);
}
window.onload=rotater;
//-->
</script>

At first glance, this code can appear intimidating. However, all you have to do is update the path to the image files and fill in the URLs for the links. Of course, you should also update the height and width attributes to fit your site.

If you only want four images to rotate, then simply delete one of the item rows. If you want to add one, then copy and paste and update items[5] to items[6] and so on.

You've now laid the ground work for adding this image rotator to your site. But there is one more step you need to do for your images to appear on the page. Figure out where you want the images to appear on the page and copy in:

<layer id="placeholderlayer"></layer><div id="placeholderdiv"></div>
share|improve this answer

You can find an svg solution here:

http://simulacrum.dorm.duke.edu/allyourgoogle.svg

And this is the same in pure css (at this time only works in webkit-based browsers though):

http://a.qoid.us/google.html

share|improve this answer

You can add transformations to HTML using SVG and a <foreignObject>

<svg xmlns = "http://www.w3.org/2000/svg"> 
  <g transform="translate(300, 0) rotate(20)"> 
    <foreignObject x="10" y="10" width="800" height="800"> 
      <body xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"> 
        <iframe src="http://stackoverflow.com" style="width:700px;height:700px"></iframe> 
      </body> 
    </foreignObject> 
  </g> 
</svg>
share|improve this answer

To rotate the entire webpage you can use jQuery Transit and do something like this:

$("body").transition({rotate: "30deg"}, 6000);

Or if you want it to be immediately static you can do this:

$("body").css({rotate: "30deg"});

JS Fiddle Demo

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.