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I have created multiple threads ( 4 threads) inside main thread. While every thread execute same functions, the scheduling of threads are not same as expected. As per my understanding of OS , linux CFS scheduler will assign "t" virtual run time quantum and on expiry of that time quantum, CPU is preempted from current thread and allocate to next thread. In this manner every thread will get fair share of CPU. What I am getting is not as per expectation.

I am expecting all threads (thread 1-4, main thread ) will get CPU before same thread(any) get CPU next time.

Expected output is

foo3-->1--->Time Now : 00:17:45.346225000

foo3-->1--->Time Now : 00:17:45.348818000

foo4-->1--->Time Now : 00:17:45.350216000

foo4-->1--->Time Now : 00:17:45.352800000

main is running ---> 1--->Time Now : 00:17:45.355803000

main is running ---> 1--->Time Now : 00:17:45.360606000

foo2-->1--->Time Now : 00:17:45.345305000

foo2-->1--->Time Now : 00:17:45.361666000

foo1-->1--->Time Now : 00:17:45.354203000

foo1-->1--->Time Now : 00:17:45.362696000

foo1-->2--->Time Now : 00:17:45.362716000 // foo1 thread got CPU 2nd time as expected

foo1-->2--->Time Now : 00:17:45.365306000

but I am getting

foo3-->1--->Time Now : 00:17:45.346225000

foo3-->1--->Time Now : 00:17:45.348818000

foo4-->1--->Time Now : 00:17:45.350216000

foo4-->1--->Time Now : 00:17:45.352800000

main is running ---> 1--->Time Now : 00:17:45.355803000

main is running ---> 1--->Time Now : 00:17:45.360606000

foo3-->2--->Time Now : 00:17:45.345305000 // // foo3 thread got CPU 2nd time UNEXPECTEDLY before scheduling other threads as per CFS

foo3-->2--->Time Now : 00:17:45.361666000

foo1-->1--->Time Now : 00:17:45.354203000

foo1-->1--->Time Now : 00:17:45.362696000

foo1-->2--->Time Now : 00:17:45.362716000

foo1-->2--->Time Now : 00:17:45.365306000

Here is my program (thread_multi.cpp)

#include <pthread.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include "boost/date_time/posix_time/posix_time.hpp"
#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <fstream>
#define NUM_THREADS  4

using namespace std;

std::string now_str()
{
    // Get current time from the clock, using microseconds resolution
    const boost::posix_time::ptime now = 
        boost::posix_time::microsec_clock::local_time();

    // Get the time offset in current day
    const boost::posix_time::time_duration td = now.time_of_day();
    const long hours        = td.hours();
    const long minutes      = td.minutes();
    const long seconds      = td.seconds();


    const long nanoseconds = td.total_nanoseconds() - ((hours * 3600 + minutes * 60 + seconds) * 1000000000);
    char buf[40];

    sprintf(buf, "Time Now : %02ld:%02ld:%02ld.%03ld", hours, minutes, seconds, nanoseconds);
    return buf;
}


/* This is our thread function.  It is like main(), but for a thread*/
void *threadFunc(void *arg)
{
    char *str;
    int i = 0;

    str=(char*)arg;

    while(i < 100 )
    {

        ++i;
        ofstream myfile ("example.txt", ios::out | ios::app | ios::binary);

        if (myfile.is_open())
          {
            myfile << str <<"-->"<<i<<"--->" <<now_str() <<" \n";

          }
          else cout << "Unable to open file";
        // generate delay 
        for(volatile int k=0;k<1000000;k++);



        if (myfile.is_open())
          {
            myfile << str <<"-->"<<i<<"--->" <<now_str() <<"\n\n";
            myfile.close();
          }
          else cout << "Unable to open file";
    }


}

int main(void)
{
    pthread_t pth[NUM_THREADS]; // this is our thread identifier
    int i = 0;

    pthread_create(&pth[0],NULL, threadFunc,  (void *) "foo1");
    pthread_create(&pth[1],NULL,  threadFunc, (void *) "foo2");
    pthread_create(&pth[2],NULL, threadFunc,  (void *) "foo3");
    pthread_create(&pth[3],NULL,  threadFunc, (void *) "foo4");



std::cout <<".............\n" <<now_str() << '\n';      

    while(i < 100)
    {

        for(int k=0;k<1000000;k++);

        ofstream myfile ("example.txt", ios::out | ios::app | ios::binary);
          if (myfile.is_open())
          {
            myfile << "main is running ---> "<< i <<"--->"<<now_str() <<'\n';
            myfile.close();
          }
          else cout << "Unable to open file";


        ++i;
    }

//  printf("main waiting for thread to terminate...\n");
    for(int k=0;k<4;k++)
    pthread_join(pth[k],NULL);

std::cout <<".............\n" <<now_str() << '\n';      
    return 0;
}

Here is Completely Fair Scheduler details

kernel.sched_min_granularity_ns = 100000 kernel.sched_wakeup_granularity_ns = 25000 kernel.sched_latency_ns = 1000000

As per sched_min_granularity_ns value,any task will be execute for that minimum amount of time and if the task needs more than that minimum time then time slice is calculated and every task will be executed for that time slice.

Here time slice is calculated using the formula ,

time slice = ( weight of each task / total weight of all tasks under that CFS run-queue ) x sched_latency_ns

Can anyone explain why I am getting those results of scheduling ???? Any help to understand the output will be highly appreciated. Thank you in advance.

I am using gcc under linux.

EDIT 1:

If I change this loop

for(int k=0;k<100000;k++);

into

for(int k=0;k<10000;k++);

then sometimes thread 1 got CPU 10 times consecutively, thread 2 got CPU for 5 times consecutively, thread 3 got CPU for 5 times consecutively, main thread 2 times consecutively, thread 4 got CPU for 7 times consecutively. It looks like different threads are preempted at random time.

Any clue for these random no of times consecutive CPU allocation to different threads.??

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1 Answer 1

CPU allocate some time to execute each thread. Why each thread doesn't make same number of print?

I'll explain this within an example :

Admit that you computer can make 100 instructions by ns Admit that make 1 print is equivalent to use 25 instructions Admit that each thread have 1ns to work

Now you have to understand that all program in the computer is consumming the 100 available instructions

If when your thread want to print something there is 100 instructions available, it can print 4 sentences. If when your thread want to print something there is 40 instructions available, it can print 1 sentences. There is only 40 instructions because some other program is using instructions.

Do you get it?

If you have any question, you are welcome. :)

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