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Someone sent me some R code to read a netCDF file using the R package raster, among others. The code creates a series of *.tif files. Unfortunately, I am not very familiar with raster, *.tif files or netCDF files. So, I have tried to alter the R code to also write *.csv files. I think the code below writes the same grid cell data in *.tif format and *.csv format. However, I am not certain. I am hoping someone may be able to verify that the data in both formats are the same. Ideally, I would like to be able to open the *.tif files and conduct the verification myself. How can I do that?

Perhaps a direct comparison is not possible if the *.tif files only contain an image instead of numbers. In that case I would like to verify that the image in the *.tif files correspond to the data in the *.csv files

Below the R code are the contents of a *.csv file with a follow-up question about the column and row 'headings'.

setwd('c:/users/mark w miller/netCDF/')

my.file <- "my.netCDF.nc"
my.var1 <- "my.variable"

library(ncdf) 
library(rgdal) 
library(chron) 
library(fields) 

file    <- open.ncdf(my.file)
long    <- get.var.ncdf(file, varid="lon")
lat     <- get.var.ncdf(file, varid="lat")
time    <- get.var.ncdf(file, varid="time")
my.varb <- get.var.ncdf(file, varid=my.var1)

#netCDF to raster
library(raster)

r       <- brick(my.file, varname = my.var1)

#Crop spatial coverage
e       <- extent(255,265,35,45)
rc      <- crop(r, e, bylayer=TRUE)

lat2    <- lat[  lat >=  35 & lat  <=  45]
long2   <- long[long >= 255 & long <= 265]

list1   <- unstack(rc)
rs      <- stack(list1)

for(i in 1:5){
     r2 <- 1+(i-1)*12
     s2 <- 2+(i-1)*12
     a2 <- rs[[r2]]
     b2 <- rs[[s2]]
     m2 <- stack(a2,b2)
     my.var <- overlay(m2, fun=function(x,y) {(x+y)}, unstack=TRUE, recycle=FALSE) 
     f2 <- 1999+i

     writeRaster(my.var, filename=paste("my.var", f2, ".tif"), format="GTiff")

     my.var2 <- as.matrix(my.var, nrow=length(lat2), byrow=TRUE)

     write.table(my.var2, file = paste0("my.var", f2, ".csv"), quote = FALSE, sep=",", col.names = FALSE, row.names = FALSE)
}

Here are the rounded contents of one *.csv file:

1.0,0.9,0.8,0.8,0.7,0.7,0.8,0.8,1.0,1.0
1.0,0.8,0.6,0.5,0.4,0.5,0.7,0.9,1.0,1.0
1.0,0.7,0.5,0.4,0.3,0.4,0.7,1.0,1.0,1.0
0.0,0.5,0.4,0.4,0.4,0.6,1.0,1.0,1.0,1.0
0.0,0.6,0.5,0.4,0.5,0.8,1.0,2.0,2.0,2.0
1.0,0.7,0.6,0.5,0.6,1.0,1.0,2.0,2.0,2.0
1.0,0.9,0.8,0.7,0.9,1.0,2.0,2.0,2.0,2.0
1.0,1.0,1.0,1.0,1.0,2.0,2.0,2.0,1.0,2.0
2.0,1.0,1.0,1.0,2.0,2.0,2.0,1.0,1.0,2.0
1.0,1.0,2.0,2.0,2.0,2.0,2.0,2.0,2.0,3.0

Given that:

lat2
# [1] 44.5 43.5 42.5 41.5 40.5 39.5 38.5 37.5 36.5 35.5

long2
# [1] 255.5 256.5 257.5 258.5 259.5 260.5 261.5 262.5 263.5 264.5

Can I safely add the following column and row names to each *.csv file?

      255.5 256.5 257.5 258.5 259.5 260.5 261.5 262.5 263.5 264.5
44.5  1.0,0.9,0.8,0.8,0.7,0.7,0.8,0.8,1.0,1.0
43.5  1.0,0.8,0.6,0.5,0.4,0.5,0.7,0.9,1.0,1.0
42.5  1.0,0.7,0.5,0.4,0.3,0.4,0.7,1.0,1.0,1.0
41.5  0.0,0.5,0.4,0.4,0.4,0.6,1.0,1.0,1.0,1.0
40.5  0.0,0.6,0.5,0.4,0.5,0.8,1.0,2.0,2.0,2.0
39.5  1.0,0.7,0.6,0.5,0.6,1.0,1.0,2.0,2.0,2.0
38.5  1.0,0.9,0.8,0.7,0.9,1.0,2.0,2.0,2.0,2.0
37.5  1.0,1.0,1.0,1.0,1.0,2.0,2.0,2.0,1.0,2.0
36.5  2.0,1.0,1.0,1.0,2.0,2.0,2.0,1.0,1.0,2.0
35.5  1.0,1.0,2.0,2.0,2.0,2.0,2.0,2.0,2.0,3.0

Thank you for any advice. The actual netCDF file is very large. If I can figure out how to subset it and save it in the same netCDF format I might try to upload it somewhere.

EDIT

Below is code to create simulated data, convert those simulated data into a netCDF file and analyze that netCDF file as in the code above:

setwd('c:/users/mark w miller/netCDF/')

library(raster)
library(ncdf) 
library(rgdal) 
library(chron) 
library(fields)
library(sp)

set.seed(1234)

x = seq( 255, 269, length =  8)
y = seq(  36,  40, length =  5)
xy <- expand.grid(x,y)

z  <- rnorm(nrow(xy), 10, 1)
rc <- data.frame(xy,z)

raster.rc1 <- rasterFromXYZ(rc, res=c(2,1), crs=CRS("+proj=longlat +datum=WGS84 +no_defs +ellps=WGS84 +towgs84=0,0,0"))

z  <- rnorm(nrow(xy), 10, 1)
rc <- data.frame(xy,z)

raster.rc2 <- rasterFromXYZ(rc, res=c(2,1), crs=CRS("+proj=longlat +datum=WGS84 +no_defs +ellps=WGS84 +towgs84=0,0,0"))

z  <- rnorm(nrow(xy), 10, 1)
rc <- data.frame(xy,z)

raster.rc3 <- rasterFromXYZ(rc, res=c(2,1), crs=CRS("+proj=longlat +datum=WGS84 +no_defs +ellps=WGS84 +towgs84=0,0,0"))

z  <- rnorm(nrow(xy), 10, 1)
rc <- data.frame(xy,z)

raster.rc4 <- rasterFromXYZ(rc, res=c(2,1), crs=CRS("+proj=longlat +datum=WGS84 +no_defs +ellps=WGS84 +towgs84=0,0,0"))


all.years <- list(raster.rc1, raster.rc2, raster.rc3, raster.rc4)

#all.rc    <- stack(all.years)

all.rc    <- brick(all.years)

writeRaster(all.rc, filename="example.netCDF.nc", format="CDF", bylayer=TRUE, overwrite=TRUE)


my.file   <- open.ncdf('example.netCDF.nc')
my.file

long   <- get.var.ncdf(my.file, varid="longitude")
lat    <- get.var.ncdf(my.file, varid="latitude")
time   <- get.var.ncdf(my.file, varid="value")
my.var <- get.var.ncdf(my.file, varid="variable")

long
# [1] 255 257 259 261 263 265 267 269

lat
# [1] 40 39 38 37 36

time
# [1] 1 2 3 4

my.var

r       <- brick('example.netCDF.nc', varname = 'variable')

#Crop spatial coverage
e       <- extent(257,267,37,39)
rc      <- crop(r, e, bylayer=TRUE)

lat2    <- lat[  lat >=  37 & lat  <=  39]
lat2
long2   <- long[long >= 257 & long <= 267]
long2

list1   <- unstack(rc)
rs      <- stack(list1)

for(i in 1:2){
     r2 <- 1+(i-1)*2
     s2 <- 2+(i-1)*2
     a2 <- rs[[r2]]
     b2 <- rs[[s2]]
     m2 <- stack(a2,b2)
     my.sim <- overlay(m2, fun=function(x,y) {(x+y)}, unstack=TRUE, recycle=FALSE) 
     f2 <- 2010+i

     writeRaster(my.sim, filename=paste("my.sim", f2, ".tif"), format="GTiff")

     my.sim2 <- as.matrix(my.sim, nrow=length(lat2), byrow=TRUE)

     write.table(my.sim2, file = paste0("my.sim", f2, ".csv"), quote = FALSE, sep=",", col.names = FALSE, row.names = FALSE)
}
share|improve this question
    
I would start with as.data.frame(subset(rc, 1), xy=TRUE) –  mdsumner Mar 18 at 19:34
    
@mdsumner Thank you. That seems to extract one layer of data and convert it to a data frame. Perhaps I can somehow use create.ncdf to turn that data frame into a netCDF file. –  Mark Miller Mar 18 at 20:15
    
Use writeRaster to create a netcdf file –  mdsumner Mar 18 at 21:10
    
@mdsumner Thank you. I have added code to create simulated data, convert those simulated data into a netCDF file and analyze that netCDF file as in the original code. My objective now is to verify that the *.tif files contain the same data (or at least the same information) as the *.csv files. –  Mark Miller Mar 18 at 23:13

1 Answer 1

Here is a general way to compare the contents of *.tiff files and *.csv files. Comparing the contents of an example *.csv file with its *.tiff plot makes me feel confident that their contents are the same.

Below that I show how to display the data within the *.tiff file.

setwd('c:/users/mmiller21/netCDF/')

library(raster)

# Here are the contents of 'my.sim2011.csv':
#
# 18.31545067  20.22907639  20.34417152  18.11485672  17.93542576  19.52469158
# 19.20878696  19.43614769  18.41953754  16.42925882  22.05830574  18.31794167
#
# compared with the plot of 'my.sim 2011 .tif'

jpeg(filename = "my.sim.2011.jpeg")

  r <- raster('my.sim 2011 .tif')
  plot(r)
  title(main='my.sim 2011 .tif')

dev.off()

enter image description here

# Here are the contents of 'my.sim2012.csv':
#
# 18.92995739  20.68585968  20.44407845  20.53401566  19.1156435   20.70266819
# 19.04809856  20.76659107  20.50794601  18.52109146  20.92043018  19.91858768
#
# compared with the plot of 'my.sim 2012 .tif'

jpeg(filename = "my.sim.2012.jpeg")

  r <- raster('my.sim 2012 .tif')
  plot(r)
  title(main='my.sim 2012 .tif')

dev.off()

enter image description here

Here is code to display the data in one example *.tiff file. That data does match the data within the corresponding *.csv file.

r <- raster('my.sim 2011 .tif')

r[1,]
[1] 18.31545 20.22908 20.34417 18.11486 17.93543 19.52469

r[2,]
[1] 19.20879 19.43615 18.41954 16.42926 22.05831 18.31794
share|improve this answer

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