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I have this configuration file where I have statistics: number of iterations and a time delta object. I am trying to find a pythonic and safe way of evaluating this values. So the config file looks like this (test_config.cfg):

[Section]

option1 = (6, datetime.timedelta(0, 9, 520000))
option2 = (4, datetime.timedelta(0, 8, 510000))

That entry time.timedelta() gets there when I use RawConfigParser.set('Section', 'option', (i, t_delta)) where t_delta would simply be the time span between two operations and i is the number of iterations. When reading this values back from the config they are returned as strings. I want to evaluate them for what they were initially. What I have tried and works but I feel there has to be a safer, respectivelly pythonic way of doing it:

import ConfigParser
import datetime

config = ConfigParser.RawConfigParser()
config.read('test_config.cfg')

stats = config.get('Section', 'option1')

# The obvious way is with eval() but makes me very uncomfortable using it
iterations = eval(stats)[0] # 6
duration = eval(stats)[1] # 0:00:09.520000

# The ugly way is with stripping and splitting
duration_tuple = tuple(int(i) for i in stats.split('(')[-1].strip(')').split(','))
duration = datetime.timedelta(*duration_tuple)
iterations = int(stats.split(',')[0].lstrip('('))
print iterations # 6
print duration # 0:00:09.520000

So is there a better way? Eventually is there a way of having only the 'tuple' used by the timedelta object when setting to the config? Like (0, 9, 520000) instead of datetime.timedelta(0, 9, 520000). In this way I could easily use ast.literal_eval(). Thanks!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can convert timedelta to seconds (expressed as a float so that partial seconds are not lost).

RawConfigParser.set('Section', 'option1', '%s,%s' % (i, t_delta.total_seconds()))

Now your section looks like:

[Section]
option1 = (6, 9.520000)
option2 = (4, 8.510000)

And you can skip using eval:

stats = RawConfigParser.get('Section', 'option1').split(',')
iterations = int(stats[0]) # 6
duration = datetime.timedelta(seconds=float(stats[1])) # 0:00:09.520000

(edit)

Here's a worked example that uses ast.literal_eval for one option and split/cast for another option. literal_eval is a bit more risky because a bad actor can run more code than you want, but is still reasonable. The split/cast method is much more strict about what input it will accept:

>>> from ConfigParser import RawConfigParser
>>> import datetime
>>> import ast
>>> 
>>> i = 6
>>> t_delta = datetime.timedelta(0, 9, 520000)
>>> 
>>> config = RawConfigParser()
>>> config.add_section('Section')
>>> config.set('Section', 'option_for_eval', (i, t_delta.total_seconds()))
>>> config.set('Section', 'option_for_cast', '%s,%f' % (i, t_delta.total_seconds()))
>>> config.write(open('/tmp/config.ini', 'w'))
>>> 
>>> config = RawConfigParser()
>>> config.read('/tmp/config.ini')
['/tmp/config.ini']
>>> option_for_eval = config.get('Section', 'option_for_eval')
>>> option_for_eval
'(6, 9.52)'
>>> i, t_delta = ast.literal_eval(option_for_eval)
>>> i, t_delta
(6, 9.52)
>>> 
>>> option_for_cast = config.get('Section', 'option_for_cast')
>>> stat = option_for_cast.split(',')
>>> i = int(stat[0])
>>> t_delta = datetime.timedelta(seconds=float(stat[1]))
>>> i, t_delta
(6, datetime.timedelta(0, 9, 520000))
>>> 
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the t_delta.total_seconds() part but I still need to use ast.literal_eval() which is ok, because the float(stats[1]) part does not work since it is still a string so stats[1] will be 6 and stats[0] will be '('. –  Herr Actress Mar 18 at 20:27
    
@HerrActress: Apply ast.literal_eval to the whole string first: stats = ast.literal_eval('(6, 9.520000)'). –  unutbu Mar 18 at 20:29
    
Yes this is definitely what I was looking for. Thank you. Ideally I would also update the answer with the ast.literal_eval part for the posterity :) –  Herr Actress Mar 18 at 20:38
    
@HerrActress, I should have paid closer attention. Literal_eval is certainly safer than eval, and is a good solution. I think I would still perform the conversions myself. I'll update the anwser. –  tdelaney Mar 18 at 21:09

Using

RawConfigParser.set('Section', 'option', (i, [t_delta.days, t_delta.seconds, t_delta.microseconds]))

you could arrange for your config file to look like this:

[Section]

option1 = [6, [0, 9, 520000]]
option2 = [4, [0, 8, 510000]]

Then you could use json to parse the string returned by config.get:

import ConfigParser
import datetime
import json

config = ConfigParser.RawConfigParser()
config.read('test_config.cfg')

stats = config.get('Section', 'option1')
stats = json.loads(stats)
iterations = stats[0] # 6
duration = datetime.timedelta(*stats[1]) # 0:00:09.520000
print iterations # 6
print duration # 0:00:09.520000

This is essentially the same idea as using ast.literal_eval.


To parse a config file in JSON format:

However, if you have the option, I think it would be simpler to drop ConfigParser and just use JSON. For example, if the config file looked like this:

{"option2": [4, [0, 8, 510000]], "option1": [6, [0, 9, 520000]]}

then to read it back into Python you could use:

import datetime
import json

with open('test_config.cfg', 'r') as f:
    config = json.load(f)
stats = config['option1']
iterations = stats[0] # 6
duration = datetime.timedelta(*stats[1]) # 0:00:09.520000
print iterations # 6
print duration # 0:00:09.520000

To save the config to a file in JSON format:

config = {'option': [i, [t_delta.days, t_delta.seconds, t_delta.microseconds]}
with open('test_config.json', 'w') as f:
    json.dump(config, f)
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the elaborate answer –  Herr Actress Mar 18 at 20:40

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