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Basically I'm developing for an iPhone and I compile fine on the Mac, however I want to use NEON intrinsics to accelerate my vector math. I have experience with SSE and AVX, however I have no idea where to get the NEON header with the intrinsics from. I found only one on the net and it only worked for GCC, all the functions had some __builtin keywords behind them. I'm compiling on the xcode llvm 5.0 compiler. I know I can use ARM assembly, however I'd like to use the intrinsic functions instead, since they make it easier. I've seen some in DirectXMath, encapsulated in vector objects, however they also had an #include , however there was no arm_neon.h anywhere.

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Header file for neon intrinsics is called arm_neon.h, it should be available within your build environment. –  auselen Mar 18 '14 at 20:27
    
@auselen Ok I found one for GCC and one for MSVC(in the Windows 8 kit) they have some differences in the type and function declarations, but I think all the names are the same. Of course it won't run if I compile it on my PC, however if I use the functions defined from the windows header, they'll be the same as the ones on the Mac, where I code for the iPhone, right? This brings the question - why does Microsoft support NEON anyway? –  ulak blade Mar 18 '14 at 20:37
    
I think MSVC supports ARM on mobile platforms –  Paul R Mar 18 '14 at 20:41
    
but MSVC can only build for one mobile platform - Windows Phone, right? The thing is I'm developing cross-platform, so on PC I have a macro that choses SSE intrinsics and for the iPhone, it choses the NEON ones, I just have to be sure that the ones presented in the Windows 8 SDK are correct. –  ulak blade Mar 18 '14 at 20:45
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