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In Visual Studio, using a c# project, instead of placing a class that contains multiple methods and properties in a single file would there be any downsides to using multiple files with the partial keyword and nested file linking?

For example, if I have a class called Customer that has some properties and two methods: GetOrders and GetAddress. Instead of creating one file called Customer.cs and placing all the code for the properties and two methods in that file I would create a Customer.cs and place only the properties in that file. I would mark the class as partial. I would then create each method in a new file called Customer_GetOrders.cs and Customer_GetAddress.cs, each containing a Customer class marked as partial and only the code for that method. In Visual Studio I would nest the Customer_GetOrders.cs and Customer_GetAddress.cs files under the Customer.cs file.

The upsides I can see are less code in a file to look at so instead of scrolling up and down in a big file you would only see the code dealing with the method you are working on. Also if you are using source control merges would be easier since you would only have to deal with the code in each method. And since methods are bound by physical files you could easily see the change history of a method by looking at the change history of the file.

The downsides I can see are having a lot of small files but I don't think that would be so bad. Are there any other downsides with this line of thought?

Thanks,

Frank

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So far the answers given have not completely discredited my idea, it may not follow some design patterns but I have not found anything stating "doing this is bad because it would break visual studio" or "lots of files in a visual studio project is bad because". I plan to try this setup out on my next project and see how well it really works. –  Frank Mar 24 '14 at 22:29

2 Answers 2

The upsides I can see are less code in a file to look at so instead of scrolling up and down in a big file you would only see the code dealing with the method you are working on. Also if you are using source control merges would be easier since you would only have to deal with the code in each method. And since methods are bound by physical files you could easily see the change history of a method by looking at the change history of the file.

All of these upsides, in my opinion, are only "upsides" if the class is too big. If your class adheres to the Single Responsibility Principle, the file should never be "too big" to manage.

Also, most IDEs (such as Visual Studio) already provide a huge amount of functionality to navigate the files quickly (such as the pulldowns that jump directly to members).

The downsides I can see are having a lot of small files but I don't think that would be so bad. Are there any other downsides with this line of thought?

You're splitting your types up across multiple files, which makes it far less maintainable and more difficult to follow, as the data used by the type is no longer near the methods that use it.

You also add extra maintenance cost to refactoring, as method renames, for example, now would require additional work (file renames) which would break your "history" of that method within that file.

Overall, I'd find this a bad practice. Partial classes are great if you have generated code, and want to be able to add other logic to a generated code file, but otherwise, they tend to be something I'd personally avoid.

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Partial Classes are also great, where in a team, you've different people working on the different methods in the same class. –  abhi Mar 18 '14 at 20:39
    
@abhi I actually disagree - I think that if your type is so large you want to split it up, you're violating SRP. –  Reed Copsey Mar 18 '14 at 20:40
    
@ReedCopsey OK, I can see that SRP would solve the file size problem but it would not help for the merging problem. If you have multiple devs on a project and they are all editing a different method on the same class when it comes time to check in that code they will all have to deal with conflicts, which could result in someone else's code getting changed accidentally. As for refactoring, most source code control system can handle a rename and keep the history. –  Frank Mar 19 '14 at 11:09
    
@Frank Most decent source control can handle merges, too... Renames tend to break history in almost all of them. –  Reed Copsey Mar 19 '14 at 15:52
    
@ReedCopsey I think I disagree with that, merging is usually the hardest part of source control mostly due to the contents of the file being rearranged. I know of only one product that does this well: semanticmerge.com. Most others just do file diffs which start to break down fast if the order of the methods in a file change. Having separate physical files for each method would prevent this headache all together. Renames in source control can be problematic if you don't use the tools correctly, both SVN and GIT support renames well only if you use the correct commands. –  Frank Mar 20 '14 at 13:21

It is a Code Smell to me: a class sufficiently large that something is gained in understanding by partitioning into multiple parts is an indication that it has too many responsibilities. It's probably a poorly thought out abstraction that should be partitioned into multiple classes.

For example, if I have a class called Customer that has some properties and two methods: GetOrders and GetAddress. Instead of creating one file called Customer.cs and placing all the code for the properties and two methods in that file I would create a Customer.cs and place only the properties in that file. I would mark the class as partial. I would then create each method in a new file called Customer_GetOrders.cs and Customer_GetAddress.cs, each containing a Customer class marked as partial and only the code for that method. In Visual Studio I would nest the Customer_GetOrders.cs and Customer_GetAddress.cs files under the Customer.cs file.

From a modelling perspective, GetAddress() and GetOrders() shouldn't be methods, at least, not on the Customer object. A Customer probably has 1 or more Address properties and single, collection-like property, Orders, that represents the customer's order history.

I think your abstraction is missing some classes. Perhaps you need an OrderFactory, that given a Customer (and possibly other criteria), knows how to find 1 or more of the customer's orders.

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OK, From Reed's comments above, I see that SRP should prevent the file size problem, which is similar to what you are saying. I admit my example was not the best, but even in the OrderFactory example, you sill might have at least 3 or 4 methods like GetOrder, SaveOrder, FindOrders, and DeleteOrder. Each of these will be a few lines of code. Would splitting them into there own files for the sake of version control be that bad? From an IDE viewpoint, is overuse of the partial keyword a performance problem? –  Frank Mar 19 '14 at 11:18

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