Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have looked around Stack Overflow and there have been a few really good answers on this, (my code is actually based on this answer here) but for some reason I am getting weird behavior in that thread_func should be called ls1 times, but it is only running between 0 and 2 times before the threads exit. It seems like ioService.stop() is cutting off queued jobs before they are completed, but from what I understand this should not happen. Here is the relevant code snippet:

boost::asio::io_service ioService;
boost::asio::io_service::work work(ioService);

boost::thread_group threadpool;

for (unsigned t = 0; t < num_threads; t++)
{   
    threadpool.create_thread(boost::bind(&boost::asio::io_service::run, &ioService));
}   

//Iterate over the dimensions of the matrices
for (unsigned i = 0; i < ls1; i++)
{   
    ioService.post(boost::bind(&thread_func,i, rs1, rs2, ls2, arr, left_arr, &result));
}   

ioService.stop();
threadpool.join_all();

Any help would be greatly appreciated, thanks!

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

io_service::stop() causes all invocations of run() or run_one() to return as soon as possible. It does not remove any outstanding handlers that are already queued into the io_service. When io_service::stop() is invoked, the threads in threadpool will return as soon as possible, causing each thread of execution to be complete.

As io_service::post() will return immediately after requesting that the io_service invoke the handler, it is non-deterministic as to how many posted handlers will be invoked by threads in threadpool before the io_service is stopped.

If you wish for thread_func to be invoked ls1 times, then one simple alternative is to reorganize the code so that work is added to the io_service before the threadpool services it, and then the application lets the io_service run to completion.

boost::asio::io_service ioService;

// Add work to ioService.
for (unsigned i = 0; i < ls1; i++)
{   
  ioService.post(boost::bind(
      &thread_func,i, rs1, rs2, ls2, arr, left_arr, &result));
}   

// Now that the ioService has work, use a pool of threads to service it.
boost::thread_group threadpool;    
for (unsigned t = 0; t < num_threads; t++)
{   
  threadpool.create_thread(boost::bind(
      &boost::asio::io_service::run, &ioService));
}   

// Once all work has been completed (thread_func invoked ls1 times), the
// threads in the threadpool will be completed and can be joined.
threadpool.join_all();
share|improve this answer
    
This worked perfectly thanks for the great explanation! –  user1023465 Mar 20 '14 at 22:33

If you're expecting thread_func to be called ls1 times, then you should wait until it is actually called ls1 times before stopping io_service. As written, stop() may be called before any of the threads had a chance to have been scheduled even.

There are many ways to wait for that condition. For example you could use a condition variable:

#include <boost/asio.hpp>
#include <boost/thread.hpp>
unsigned num_threads = 10, ls1=11;
int result = 0;
boost::mutex m;
boost::condition_variable cv;
void thread_func(unsigned , int* result) {
    /* do stuff */
    {
        boost::lock_guard<boost::mutex> lk(m);
        ++*result;
    }
    cv.notify_one();
}
int main()
{
    boost::asio::io_service ioService;
    boost::asio::io_service::work work(ioService);
    boost::thread_group threadpool;
    for (unsigned t = 0; t < num_threads; t++)
        threadpool.create_thread(boost::bind(&boost::asio::io_service::run,
                                             &ioService));
    for (unsigned i = 0; i < ls1; i++)
        ioService.post(boost::bind(&thread_func,i,&result));

    {
        boost::unique_lock<boost::mutex> lk(m);
        cv.wait(lk, []{return result == ls1; });
    }
    ioService.stop();
    threadpool.join_all();
    std::cout << "result = " << result << '\n';
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.