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I want to extract bits of a decimal no.

For example 7 has a binary 0111 and i want to get 0 1 1 1 all bits stored in bool how can i do so?

OK, a loop is not a good option, can I do something else to this?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 51 down vote accepted

If you want the k-th bit of n, then do

(n & ( 1 << k )) >> k

Here we create a mask, apply the mask to n, and then right shift the masked value to get just the bit we want. We could write it out more fully as:

    int mask =  1 << k;
    int masked_n = n & mask;
    int thebit = masked_n >> k;

You can read more about bit-masking here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mask_(computing)

Here is a program:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int *get_bits(int n, int bitswanted){
  int *bits = malloc(sizeof(int) * bitswanted);

  int k;
  for(k=0; k<bitswanted; k++){
    int mask =  1 << k;
    int masked_n = n & mask;
    int thebit = masked_n >> k;
    bits[k] = thebit;
  }

  return bits;
}

int main(){
  int n=7;

  int  bitswanted = 5;

  int *bits = get_bits(n, bitswanted);

  printf("%d = ", n);

  int i;
  for(i=bitswanted-1; i>=0;i--){
    printf("%d ", bits[i]);
  }

  printf("\n");
}
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10  
(n >> k) & 1 is equally valid and does not require computing the mask as the mask is constant due to shifting before masking instead of the other way around. –  Joe May 22 '13 at 15:37

Here's one way to do it—there are many others:

bool b[4];
int v = 7;  // number to dissect

for (int j = 0;  j < 4;  ++j)
   b [j] =  0 != (v & (1 << j));
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here's a very simple way to do it;

int main() {

int s=7,l=1;
vector <bool> v;
v.clear();
while(l<=4)
{
    v.push_back(s%2);
    s/=2;
    l++;
}
for(l=(v.size()-1);l>=0;l--)
{
    cout<<v[l]<<" ";
}

return 0; }

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If you don't want any loops, you'll have to write it out:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdbool.h>

int main(void)
{
int num = 7;

#if 0
bool arr[4] = { (num&1) ?true: false, (num&2) ?true: false, (num&4) ?true: false, (num&8) ?true: false };
#else
#define BTB(v,i) ((v) & (1u << (i))) ? true : false
bool arr[4] = { BTB(num,0), BTB(num,1), BTB(num,2), BTB(num,3)};
#undef BTB
#endif

printf("%d %d %d %d\n", arr[3], arr[2], arr[1], arr[0]);

return 0;
}

As demonstrated here, this also works in an initializer.

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#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
    int number = 7; /* signed */
    int vbool[8 * sizeof(int)];
    int i;
        for (i = 0; i < 8 * sizeof(int); i++)
        {
            vbool[i] = number<<i < 0;   
            printf("%d", vbool[i]);
        }
    return 0;
}
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