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I have a data.table of measurements, each column has a lower detection limit, (and possibly an upper detection limit)

set.seed(1)
dt <- data.table(id=1:5, A=rnorm(5), B=rnorm(5, mean=2), C=rnorm(5,mean=-1))
setkey(dt, id)
# "randomly" disperse upper an lower limits to measurement columns
dt[3,A := -5]
dt[2,B := -3]
dt[5,B := 7]
dt[1,C := -10]
dt
   id          A         B           C
1:  1 -0.6264538  1.179532 -10.0000000
2:  2  0.1836433 -3.000000  -0.6101568
3:  3 -5.0000000  2.738325  -1.6212406
4:  4  1.5952808  2.575781  -3.2146999
5:  5  0.3295078  7.000000   0.1249309

I want to filter (set to NA) out values in each column of dt which exactly match the lower and upper measurement limits listed in another data.table:

limits <- data.table(measurement=LETTERS[1:3], lower=c(-5,-3,-10), 
                     upper=c(NA, 7, NA))
setkey(limits, measurement)
limits
   measurement lower upper
1:           A    -5    NA
2:           B    -3     7
3:           C   -10    NA

My expected output is:

dt
   id          A        B          C
1:  1 -0.6264538 1.179532         NA
2:  2  0.1836433       NA -0.6101568
3:  3         NA 2.738325 -1.6212406
4:  4  1.5952808 2.575781 -3.2146999
5:  5  0.3295078       NA  0.1249309

I wasn't able to construct a nice solution to this, so at the moment I'm using a clungy for loop to get the job done:

for (i in 1:nrow(dt)) {
  for (j in 2:ncol(dt)) {
    if (is.na(dt[i, j, with=F])) {
      next
    } else if (dt[i, j, with=F] == limits[names(dt)[j]][, lower]) {
      dt[i, j := NA_real_, with=F]
    } else if (is.na(limits[names(dt)[j]][, upper])) {
      next
    } else if (dt[i, j, with=F] == limits[names(dt)[j]][, upper]) {
      dt[i, j := NA_real_, with=F] 
    } else {
      next
    }   
  }
}

But there has to be something nicer and faster? I had a play around with applying each column of the limits data.table to each row of dt, but didn't have any success.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

First, I'd transpose your limiits data.table as follows:

require(reshape2)
require(data.table)
limits = dcast.data.table(melt(limits, id=1), variable ~ measurement)

#    variable  A  B   C
# 1:    lower -5 -3 -10
# 2:    upper NA  7  NA

Then you can match corresponding columns for i and replace those matches with NA using set as follows:

for (i in 2:ncol(dt)) {
    set(dt, i=which(dt[[i]] %in% limits[[i]]), j=i, value=NA_real_)
}

#    id          A        B          C
# 1:  1 -0.6264538 1.179532         NA
# 2:  2  0.1836433       NA -0.6101568
# 3:  3         NA 2.738325 -1.6212406
# 4:  4  1.5952808 2.575781 -3.2146999
# 5:  5  0.3295078       NA  0.1249309
share|improve this answer

Here is an alternative:

dt[, 2:length(dt) := lapply(
  2:length(dt), 
  function(x) ifelse(.SD[[x]] %in% limits[x - 1, c(lower, upper)], NA, .SD[[x]])
) ]

Since your rows in limits are in the same order as the columns in dt, you can just cycle through the columns:

   id          A        B          C
1:  1 -0.6264538 1.179532         NA
2:  2  0.1836433       NA -0.6101568
3:  3         NA 2.738325 -1.6212406
4:  4  1.5952808 2.575781 -3.2146999
5:  5  0.3295078       NA  0.1249309
share|improve this answer
    
+1. The only difference is that here, the entire column is being recreated. In set, just the entries those match are being replaced (the column won't be copied). Do sapply(dt, address) before and after to verify. –  Arun Mar 19 '14 at 13:17
    
@Arun, didn't realize this subtlety in set. Always learning something new from you. –  BrodieG Mar 19 '14 at 13:27
    
Glad :). In this case, for+set is great because otherwise to use := and not make a copy you'd have to do: DT[<match?>, A := NA] - repeat for B and C. The expression has to be in i for just those positions to be replaced without copying, basically. Makes sense really :). –  Arun Mar 19 '14 at 13:32

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