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I've written a Perl script, below which generates a warning and I can't work out why.

#!/usr/local/bin/perl -w

$status = $ENV{ 'STATUS' };
if ( $status eq "" )
{
    $status = 0;
}
else
{
    $status = 1;
}

It says "Use of uninitialized value in string eq at ./x.pl line 4."

Line 4 is the "if ( $status eq "" )" line but the variable was initialised..

Any ideas how I can get rid of this warning..

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2  
In case you didn't know, it is generally considered better to use warnings rather than -w. See perldoc perllexwarn for more info: perldoc.perl.org/perllexwarn.html Also, it is a good idea to use strict; in your modules. Strict helps prevent a lot of headaches. –  daotoad Feb 12 '10 at 17:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

$ENV{'STATUS'} may not be defined.

If you run

export STATUS=blah

in shell before running the perl script, it will work

fix it with

#!/usr/local/bin/perl -w
$status = $ENV{ 'STATUS' };
if (!defined($status) || $status eq "" )
{
    $status = 0;
}
else
{
    $status = 1;
}
share|improve this answer
    
setting the env var or not doesn't work. I tried that first. –  ScaryAardvark Feb 12 '10 at 9:18
    
But the defined($status) seems to do the trick, thx. –  ScaryAardvark Feb 12 '10 at 9:20
1  
Why not if ( defined $status and length $status ) { $status = 1 } else { $status = 0 }? It makes the condition a bit simpler. –  daotoad Feb 12 '10 at 17:41

I know your question is about the warning but you can use the conditional operator ?: to set $status if not defined or empty string

$status = $ENV{'STATUS'} ? 1 : 0;
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6  
Note that this does not distinguish between $ENV{STATUS} not being set and $ENV{STATUS} being set to 0. That's usually not an issue, but can cause subtle bugs in some cases. –  Dave Sherohman Feb 12 '10 at 11:30
    
This is a fairly common newbie bug (and why are people voting it up?). You only want to set a default value if the value isn't already defined. If you're using Perl 5.10, you can use the $status = $ENV{'STATUS'} // 0; . Before Perl 5.10, you have to pull out defined to check it. –  brian d foy Feb 12 '10 at 21:15
    
@brian: By "you have to pull out defined to check", do you mean having $status = defined($ENV{'STATUS'}) ? 1 : 0; ? If the $ENV{'STATUS'} is set to empty string (export STATUS=''), defined($ENV{'STATUS'}) will evaluate to true (value has been set) so $status will be set to 1, but $ENV{'STATUS'} will evaluate to false so set $status to 0; The OP wants that, at the end, if there is an empty string, $status = 0. Am I misinterpreting something? –  ccheneson Feb 12 '10 at 22:27
    
The OP is trying to get rid of a warning. So, you have to get rid of the warning. :) –  brian d foy Feb 12 '10 at 22:48

Another option is

$status = $ENV{ 'STATUS' } // '';

which will set $status to an empty string if it is not defined, but the // operator only exists in perl 5.10 and later. The equivalent pre-5.10 syntax is

$status = defined $ENV{STATUS} ? $ENV{STATUS} : '';

although a lot of people will fake it with

$status = $ENV{ 'STATUS' } || '';

but this will change an $ENV{STATUS} of 0 into an empty string, which may or may not be an issue for you.

Those are all general-case answers, however. In the particular code you posted, replacing the whole thing with

$status = defined $ENV{STATUS} ? 1 : 0;

or even just

$status = defined $ENV{STATUS};

(if you're OK with the 'not set' value being an empty string instead of 0) would be the better option.

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