Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Consider the following snippet:

void f(void);

void g(…)
{
  …
  return f();
  …
}

Is this return f(); valid according to C11?

I am not advocating using this pattern: if it works at all, it is obviously equivalent to f(); return; (where the return; itself would be redundant if this is at the end of function g()). I am asking this question in the context of the static analysis of C programs, where the C code has already been written by someone else and the question is deciding whether or not it is valid according to the standard.

I would interpret C11 6.8.6.4:1 as meaning that it is non-standard and should be statically rejected. Is it possible to interpret it differently (I have found this pattern in actual and otherwise high-quality source code)?

Constraints

A return statement with an expression shall not appear in a function whose return type is void. A return statement without an expression shall only appear in a function whose return type is void.

share|improve this question
    
Does the compiler you are using reject the code, accept the code quietly or accept it with a warning? Was the code once ISO C? –  Ray Toal Mar 19 '14 at 14:30
1  
@RayToal GCC accepts the program in al-Khwārizmī's answer with -std=c11 -Wall without a peep, but -pedantic causes a diagnostic. –  Pascal Cuoq Mar 19 '14 at 14:32
    
Clang warns with -Wpedantic as well: void function 'f' should not return void expression [-Wpedantic] –  Carl Norum Mar 19 '14 at 14:34
3  
GCC diagnosing only with -pedantic is a good indicator that this is a conforming extension. I assume this is for compatibility with C++, where [stmt.return]/3 says "A return statement with an expression of type void can be used only in functions with a return type of cv void; the expression is evaluated just before the function returns to its caller." –  Casey Mar 19 '14 at 14:35
1  
The sentence "A return statement with an expression shall not appear in a function whose return type is void" also appears in the C89 standard, so the fact that compilers warn rather than generate static errors here is probably just a pragmatic choice. –  Ray Toal Mar 19 '14 at 14:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Anything after return is an expression.

6.8.6:1 Jump statements

Syntax  

   ...
   return expressionopt; 

And standard says that:

A return statement with an expression shall not appear in a function whose return type is void. ....

f() is also an expression here. The compiler should raise a warning

[Warning] ISO C forbids 'return' with expression, in function returning void [-pedantic]
share|improve this answer
1  
You are right: I didn't look at it this way, but the grammar in 6.8.6:1 makes it clear that f() should be considered as an expression: it cannot be anything else according to the grammar. –  Pascal Cuoq Mar 19 '14 at 14:36
    
@PascalCuoq; Yes. Added that. –  haccks Mar 19 '14 at 14:42

This clearly is a constraint violation, in particular in view of

6.3.2.2 void: The (nonexistent) value of a void expression (an expression that has type void) shall not be used in any way,

That means that the incomplete type void is a dead end that cannot be reused for any purpose whatsoever.

share|improve this answer

It clearly states A return statement without an expression shall only appear in a function whose return type is void, try and execute this:

void g()
{
    return; // does not return any expression at all
}
void f()
{
    return g();
}


int main(void) {
    f();
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
It compiles for me with a warning; Extraneous return value. –  this Mar 19 '14 at 14:29
2  
For me the the code is valid, there should be no warnings. –  al-Acme Mar 19 '14 at 14:32
    
@al-Khwārizmī Even if you compile with -Wall? –  Ray Toal Mar 19 '14 at 14:38

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.