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I have put together an UIView that incorporates pan, pinch and rotate gesture recognizers all completely within its own implementation code, so that it'll work in any view controller even one with zero code (apart from turning off auto layout in Xcode).

#import "Subview.h"

@interface Subview () <UIGestureRecognizerDelegate>

@end

@implementation Subview

- (void)awakeFromNib
{
    [self addGestureRecognizer:[[UIRotationGestureRecognizer alloc]initWithTarget:self action:@selector(rotateView:)]];
    [self addGestureRecognizer:[[UIPanGestureRecognizer alloc]initWithTarget:self action:@selector(panView:)]];
    [self addGestureRecognizer:[[UIPinchGestureRecognizer alloc]initWithTarget:self action:@selector(pinchView:)]];

    for (UIGestureRecognizer * gr in self.gestureRecognizers){
        gr.delegate = self;
    }
}

// delegate method:
- (BOOL)gestureRecognizer:(UIGestureRecognizer *)gestureRecognizer shouldRecognizeSimultaneouslyWithGestureRecognizer:(UIGestureRecognizer *)otherGestureRecognizer
{
    return YES;
}

// gesture actions:
- (void)rotateView:(UIRotationGestureRecognizer *)sender
{
    [self adjustAnchorPointForGestureRecognizer:sender];

    if (sender.state == UIGestureRecognizerStateBegan || sender.state == UIGestureRecognizerStateChanged) {
        self.transform = CGAffineTransformRotate(self.transform, sender.rotation);
        sender.rotation = 0;
    }

}

- (void)panView:(UIPanGestureRecognizer *)sender
{
    [self adjustAnchorPointForGestureRecognizer:sender];

    if (sender.state == UIGestureRecognizerStateBegan || sender.state == UIGestureRecognizerStateChanged) {
        CGPoint translation = [sender translationInView:self.superview];
        [self setCenter:CGPointMake(self.center.x + translation.x, self.center.y + translation.y)];
        [sender setTranslation:CGPointZero inView:self.superview];
    }
}

- (void)pinchView:(UIPinchGestureRecognizer *)sender
{
    [self adjustAnchorPointForGestureRecognizer:sender];

    if (sender.state == UIGestureRecognizerStateBegan || sender.state == UIGestureRecognizerStateChanged) {
        sender.view.transform = CGAffineTransformScale(sender.view.transform, sender.scale, sender.scale);
        sender.scale = 1.0;
    }
}

- (void)adjustAnchorPointForGestureRecognizer:(UIGestureRecognizer *)sender
{
    if (sender.state == UIGestureRecognizerStateBegan) {
        CGPoint locationInView = [sender locationInView:self];
        CGPoint locationInSuperview = [sender locationInView:self.superview];

        self.layer.anchorPoint = CGPointMake(locationInView.x / self.bounds.size.width, locationInView.y / self.bounds.size.height);
        self.center = locationInSuperview;
    }
}

@end

It worked great so far and the compiler gives no warnings, but I'm not sure about a view setting its own frame and center, and being its own delegate. However it does help clean up the view controller and feels quite neat and portable. So is this actually causing any subtle bugs or breaking any best practice rules?

share|improve this question
    
This mostly an opinion question. I think most experts would tell you that a view should only be responsible for the layout of it's contents, and not for it's position in it's superview. I can't think of a single example of a view that's responsible for it's own position, although I'm sure there are some :) –  David Berry Mar 19 '14 at 17:18
    
the documentation says so as well... ok guess i better give it up. thanks for answering :) –  user3399723 Mar 20 '14 at 1:10

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