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Say I'm having a Windows Form application which connected to n databases, with n connections opened simultaneously.

What I'm looking for is to do a transaction with all of those databases in one go.

For example if I were to have 2 database connections :

using (ITransaction tx1 = session1.OpenTransaction())
{
    using (ITransaction tx2 = session2.OpenTransaction())
    {
        // Do the query thingy here
    }
}

Writing all that is fine at first, but things get kind of redundant when I wanted to query here and there, and not to mention the possibility to adding a new connection.

What I wanted is to loop all of the registered session and wrap it up in a service, probably something like this :

class TransactionManager
{
    private ISession[] _sessions;

    public TransactionManager(string[] connectionStrings)
    {
        // Initialize the sessions here
    }

    public function DoTransaction(string query)
    {
        foreach (ISession session in _sessions)
        {
            // What to do here? Using? Try-catch?
        }
    }
}

If I were to use using in the foreach loop, it would mean that if connection A successful but connection B wasn't, then only connection B would be rolled back.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

It seems you may be re-inventing TransactionScope. Doing all this under a unit of work is straightforward*:

  using (TransactionScope scope = new TransactionScope())
  {
     ... Do Stuff with Connection 1 using SqlDataReader
     ... Do Stuff with Connection 2 using Entity Framework
     ... Do Stuff with Connection 3 on another Oracle Database
     ... And for good measure do some stuff in MSMQ or XA or DTC resource
     scope.Complete(); // If you are happy
  }

Stuff here doesn't need to be inline at all - it can be in a different class, or a different assembly.

Now the small print:

  • * Just remember any time you use more than one database connection concurrently, or different connections, or multiple technologies, that this will require 2 phase commit and escalate to a DTC transaction in order to ensure ACID across the resources. DTC itself has lots more small print and poses many more challenges in a corporate network, like firewalls, clustering, security configuration and bugs. If you can keep all your connections using the same database and same connection string settings, and close one before opening the next, then you can avoid DTC.

  • Maintaining a transaction across multiple ACID resources will invariably maintain locks over all of these until the transaction is committed or rolled back.

  • And last point worth mentioning is the default isolation level with TransactionScope is Serializable, which is prone to deadlocks. You'll probably want to drop this down to Read Committed.

  • If do Stuff across multiple threads, you'll need to rope in DependentTransaction

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1  
Can't believe I just know about TransactionScope just now. Where have I been all this time?? –  Samuel Adam Mar 19 '14 at 16:53
1  
Also, the TransactionScope has a terrible habit of escalating multiple connections to the MSDTC, which has terrible performance. Be weary of it. –  Haney Mar 19 '14 at 16:55

use TransactionScope, it will take care of committing or rolling back all included transactions:

using (var ts = new TransactionScope())
{
   ... // your old code

   ts.Complete()
}
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