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I convert a Microsoft SQL database to SQLite via System.Data.SQLite.dll version 1.0.90. It creates the tables, populates them and then adds the indexes.

I had a situation where a unique index was created on a table that actually had 10k entries with that supposedly unique value. When I tried running SELECT * FROM table WHERE key = I got only one row back. When I ran SELECT key, count(*) FROM table GROUP BY key I did get the correct number of records. Looking at the plan for the SELECT * query, I saw it was using the unique index, which is how I found the issue.

So... why doesn't SQLite fail to create the unique index if the index is not in fact unique?

create table test (ID INT NOT NULL, ID2 INT NOT NULL);
INSERT INTO test VALUES (1, 1);
INSERT INTO test VALUES (2, 1);
CREATE UNIQUE INDEX IX_text ON [test] (ID2);
select * from test;

Why does it allow the index to be created?

Additional info: I've confirmed the index is in fact the problem. I have three indexes defined on the table.

This is the query that fails. It uses the supposedly unique index: select * from tblPPOZip where lobid = 68

SEARCH TABLE tblPPOZip USING INDEX IX_tblPPOZip (LOBID=?) 

Trace 0 0 0  00  
Goto 0 26 0  00  
OpenRead 0 356 0 13 00  
OpenRead 1 95127 0 k(1,B) 00  
Integer 68 1 0  00  
SeekGe 1 23 1 1 00  
IdxGE 1 23 1 1 01  
IdxRowid 1 2 0  00  
Seek 0 2 0  00  
Column 0 0 3  00  
Column 0 1 4  00  
Column 1 0 5  00  
Column 0 3 6  00  
Column 0 4 7  00  
Column 0 5 8  00  
Column 0 6 9  00  
Column 0 7 10  00  
Column 0 8 11  00  
Column 0 9 12  00  
Column 0 10 13  00  
Column 0 11 14  00  
Column 0 12 15  00  
ResultRow 3 13 0  00  
Close 0 0 0  00  
Close 1 0 0  00  
Halt 0 0 0  00  
Transaction 0 0 0  00  
VerifyCookie 0 301 0  00  
TableLock 0 356 0 tblPPOZip 00  
Goto 0 2 0  00  

This query works by using + to alter the index usage: select count(*) from tbLPPOZip where +lobid = 68

SCAN TABLE tbLPPOZip USING COVERING INDEX IX_tblPPOZip

Trace 0 0 0  00  
Null 0 1 0  00  
Goto 0 14 0  00  
OpenRead 1 95127 0 k(1,B) 00  
Rewind 1 9 2 0 00  
Column 1 0 2  00  
Ne 3 8 2 (BINARY) 6a  
AggStep 0 0 1 count(0) 00  
Next 1 5 0  01  
Close 1 0 0  00  
AggFinal 1 0 0 count(0) 00  
Copy 1 4 0  00  
ResultRow 4 1 0  00  
Halt 0 0 0  00  
Transaction 0 0 0  00  
VerifyCookie 0 301 0  00  
TableLock 0 356 0 tblPPOZip 00  
Integer 68 3 0  00  
Goto 0 3 0  00  
share|improve this question
1  
We'd really need to see a small test case that proves what you're saying. – dcp Mar 19 '14 at 17:01
1  
Are you saying that the count(*) column returned values > 1? That paragraph is a bit confusing. – simon at rcl Mar 19 '14 at 17:05
    
@simon-at-rcl Sorry, it is confusing... I am so far unable to reproduce the exact situation - the production table has 141k entries, but I'm also curious why I'm allowed to create a unique index in the first place. sqlite.org/lang_createindex.html says "If the UNIQUE keyword appears between CREATE and INDEX then duplicate index entries are not allowed" – Chris Mathews Mar 19 '14 at 17:51
    
Yes I know. Does this return anything: select key, count() from table group by key having count() > 1 – simon at rcl Mar 19 '14 at 17:53
    
i'm trying to work out whether you do have dups. Your text seems to imply not: '...GROUP BY key I did get the correct number of records' – simon at rcl Mar 19 '14 at 17:54

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