Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am attempting to extract specific lines from a text file. I usually do this with grep. However, I have encountered a situation in which my usual approach is not working. An example block of text is:

my.text <- 'junk 1
junk 2
junk 3
     |  a           b           c           d           e           f       
 ----+------------------------------------------------------------------------
     |
   1 |  1     2    3    4    5    6   
     |  6     5    4    3    2    1      '   

my.data <- readLines(textConnection(my.text))

I want to extract:

   1 |  1     2    3    4    5    6   
     |  6     5    4    3    2    1

The following code works, but is not general among files:

b.top <- 'junk 3'
my.data  <- my.data[(grep(b.top, my.data)+4):length(my.data)]

The following code would be general among files, but does not work:

b.top    <- ' ----+------------------------------------------------------------------------'
my.data  <- my.data[(grep(b.top, my.data)+2):length(my.data)]

How can I get the general approach to work? I do not think - and + require an escape character, but I might be wrong. Thank you for any advice.

EDIT

Ideally I would like to extract:

1     2    3    4    5    6   
6     5    4    3    2    1

However, that might be a follow-up question.

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

In your original code, you just need to escape the + with a double backslash \\.

> b.top    <- ' ----+------------------------------------------------------------------------'
> grep(b.top, my.data)
integer(0)
> b.top    <- ' ----\\+------------------------------------------------------------------------'
> grep(b.top, my.data)
[1] 5
> my.data[(grep(b.top, my.data)+2):length(my.data)]
[1] "   1 |  1     2    3    4    5    6   "    "     |  6     5    4    3    2    1      "
> 

+ is a qualifier that means 1 or more, so in the original expression -+ was most likely interpreted as one or more -s instead of what you meant.

share|improve this answer

Not the prettiest thing in the world, but you can use a combination of gsub, grep, and strsplit to get your "ideal" answer.

> g1 <- grep("[0-9]( )", my.data, value = TRUE)
> g2 <- gsub("(.*\\|[[:space:]]+)|([[:space:]]+) ", "", g1)
> lapply(strsplit(g2, ""), as.numeric)
## [[1]]
## [1] 1 2 3 4 5 6

## [[2]]
## [1] 6 5 4 3 2 1
share|improve this answer

If line you like always comes two line after the ----, this awk may work:

awk -F\| '/----/ {f=NR} f && (NR==f+2 || NR==f+3) {print $2}' file
  1     2    3    4    5    6
  6     5    4    3    2    1      '
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. That does not look like familiar R code, but I can try it. – Mark Miller Mar 19 '14 at 18:22
    
I am not sure you can use this in R. If not sorry... – Jotne Mar 19 '14 at 18:24

This seems to work:

my.text <- 'junk 1
junk 2
junk 3
     |  a           b           c           d           e           f       
 ----+------------------------------------------------------------------------
     |
   1 |  1     2    3    4    5    6   
     |  6     5    4    3    2    1      '   

my.data <- readLines(textConnection(my.text))

my.data  <- my.data[(which(grepl("----", my.data)==TRUE)+2):length(my.data)]
my.data

[1] "   1 |  1     2    3    4    5    6   "    "     |  6     5    4    3    2    1      "

Here is code to convert to the ideal result:

my.data2 <- substr(my.data, 7, nchar(my.data))
my.data2

my.data3 <- read.table(text = my.data2, stringsAsFactors=FALSE, header = FALSE, strip.white=TRUE)
my.data3

  V1 V2 V3 V4 V5 V6
1  1  2  3  4  5  6
2  6  5  4  3  2  1
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.