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Yesterday I was at interview and was asked to implement strlen() in C without using any standard functions, all by hands. As an absolute amateur, I implemented primitive version with while loop. Looking at this my interviewer said that it can be implemented at just one line of code. I wasn't be able to produce this code using that term at that moment. After interview I asked my colleagues, and the most experienced from them gave me this piece which really worked fine:

size_t str_len (const char *str)
{
    return (*str) ? str_len(++str) + 1 : 0;
}

So there is a question, is it possible without using recursion, and if yes, how? Terms:

  • without any assembler
  • without any C functions existed in libraries
  • without just spelling few strings of code in one

Please, take note that this is not the question of optimization or real using, just the possibility of make task done.

share|improve this question
4  
This is probably better for code golf – Petesh Mar 19 '14 at 23:32
3  
"One line" is a pretty loose requirement. – hatchet Mar 19 '14 at 23:36
6  
Being able to implement strlen () in a single line is rather pointless. I'd never ask anyone to do that in an interview or otherwise. – gnasher729 Mar 19 '14 at 23:40
2  
@gnasher729: Agreed. Then again, most interview "puzzle" questions are pretty pointless except as an opportunity to watch how the candidate's mind works... assuming they don't already have an answer on tap, in which case it tells you nothing except that they have some experience. – keshlam Mar 19 '14 at 23:42
2  
In C++ you could use tail recursion: size_t strlen(const char *str, size_t acc = 0) { return *str ? strlen(str+1, acc + 1) : acc; } That should be compiled to a loop I guess – Niklas B. Mar 20 '14 at 1:01
up vote 8 down vote accepted

Similar to @DanielKamilKozar's answer, but with a for-loop, you can do this with no for-loop body, and len gets initialized properly in the function:

void my_strlen(const char *str, size_t *len)
{
    for (*len = 0; str[*len]; (*len)++);
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Ah, very clever! And so obvious. – Daniel Kamil Kozar Mar 19 '14 at 23:56
2  
What about for (*len = 0; *str; ++str, (*len)++);? That way you don't have to dereference len to index into str on every iteration. – Remy Lebeau Mar 19 '14 at 23:58
    
@RemyLebeau Yep, that would work too. I guess if you were optimizing this, you'd need to profile which is fastest out of the deference or the additional increment. Either way the compiler would likely put both str and len in registers, so probably doesn't make much difference either way – Digital Trauma Mar 20 '14 at 0:06

The best I could think of is this, but it's not the standard strlen since the function itself has a different prototype. Also, it assumes that *len is zero at start.

void my_strlen(const char *str, size_t *len)
{
        while(*(str++)) (*len)++;
}

I'm curious how a standard strlen might be implemented in "one line of code", because it's going to require a return, which is "one line of code", judging by what you've posted.

That said, I do agree with the comments saying that it's an incredibly dumb interview question.

share|improve this answer

If this doesn't have to be a function, this one-liner is probably the simplest and shortest way to calculate the length of any null-terminated array (not including variable declarations and prints):

int main() {
    const char *s = "hello world";
    int n = 0;

    while (s[++n]);

    printf ("%i\n", n);
    return 0;
}

if it must be a function, then you can't have an exact function signature as strlen(), since a return have to be in separate line. Otherwise you can do this:

void my_strlen(int* n, const char* s) {
    while (s[++(*n)]);
}

int main() {
    const char *s = "hello world";
    int n = 0;

    my_strlen(&n, s);

    printf ("%i\n", n);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your while loop counts the null terminator, so the length will always be +1 higher than what strlen() would return. You would have to use while (s[n]) ++n; instead to account for that. – Remy Lebeau Mar 20 '14 at 3:35
    
@RemyLebeau: You're correct. It's fixed now. – Lie Ryan Mar 20 '14 at 4:46
size_t str_len (const char *str)
{
    for (size_t len = 0;;++len) if (str[len]==0) return len;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I would use this: for (size_t len = 0; ; ++str, ++len) { if (!*str) return len; } – Remy Lebeau Mar 20 '14 at 0:04
1  
Aren't this actually 3 lines of code? – Alex Mar 20 '14 at 0:12
1  
note the criteria: without just spelling few strings of code in one – Lie Ryan Mar 20 '14 at 0:43
    
Lines end with a newline.. you might be thinking of "statements" – M.M Mar 20 '14 at 1:39
2  
+1 Given how vaguely the question was formulated, I think, that's the best answer: it retains both functionality and signature of the strlen(), and it's arguably done in one line. – Petr 'lapk' Budnik Mar 20 '14 at 3:04

What about an empty for loop. Like

int i=0;
for(; str[i]!=0; ++i);
share|improve this answer
3  
This is not the full function. Where's the return? – Daniel Kamil Kozar Mar 19 '14 at 23:40
    
@DanielKamilKozar Edited - The counter would have to be initialized outside the loop. But it still counts it in one line!? – user1404617 Mar 19 '14 at 23:42
1  
Meh, never mind. – Daniel Kamil Kozar Mar 19 '14 at 23:43
    
This does not make a strlen function so it does not count if that is what was wanted. – user1404617 Mar 19 '14 at 23:55
2  
it looks like two lines – Alexey Malistov Mar 20 '14 at 0:05

This seems to work fine.

unsigned short strlen4(char *str)
{
    for (int i = 0; ; i++) if (str[i] == '\0') return i;
}

Any thoughts?

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