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I have a block of code in a larger program that is suppose to take a letter (A...D) and convert it to a number (0...3). For some reason it always jumps down to the Else. Here is the code:

        my $AA = shift @filearray;

        chomp($Q);
        chomp($A1);
        chomp($A2);
        chomp($A3);
        chomp($A4);
        chomp($AA);
        print "1:$AA\n";

    #convert answer to number

    my $AB = 0;
        if ($AA eq "A")
        {
            $AB = 0;
        }

        elsif ($AA eq "B")
        {
            $AB = 1;
        }

        elsif ($AA eq "C")
        {
            $AB = 2;
        }

        else {
            $AB = 3;
        }
        print "2:$AB\n\n";

The output is along the lines of

    1:B
    2:3

    1:A
    2:3

    1:D
    2:3

    1:C
    2:3

    1:D
    2:3

    1:B
    2:3

    1:B
    2:3

    1:A
    2:3

    1:D
    2:3

Now I realize at this point I could just subtract 65 from the Ascii value, but I still want to know...what is happening?

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1  
Make sure there isn't any whitespace at the end. Change your print to print "1:$AA:" and see if anything prints between the B and the colon. –  Raymond Chen Mar 20 at 2:57
    
@RaymondChen I like that idea, though when I do it I get ::B 2:3 –  traisjames Mar 20 at 14:18
    
Also wouldn't chomp remove any whitespace? –  traisjames Mar 20 at 14:20
1  
No, at most chomp removes one "end-of-line" sequence (usually one of \n, \n\r, or \r, depending on your OS). A common issue is taking a file created on Windows (line ending \r\n) and processing it in Unix (line ending \n). A chomp in Linux will just remove the \n, leaving a \r at the end of every line. –  mob Mar 20 at 14:26
    
@Mob after some looking on how to use regex to remove EOL characters I found the line line =~ s/[\r\n]+$//; Thank you for the help. –  traisjames Mar 20 at 19:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Maybe $AA contains an invisible characters (whitespace, carriage return). Verify that $AA contains what you think it does: a single character. One way to check this:

length($AA) == 1

More advanced and more informative checks include:

use Data::Dumper;
local $Data::Dumper::Useqq = 1;
print Dumper($AA);

and

print join ' ', map { ord } split //, $AA;

and

printf '%v02X\n', $AA;

The last check displays the ordinal values for every character in $AA.

share|improve this answer
    
Looks like there are indeed hidden characters. When I run what you gave I get 1:B $VAR1 = "B\r"; 66 13 42.0D\n 2:3. Shouldn't chomp remove the \r since its whitespace? –  traisjames Mar 20 at 14:29
    
@traisjames: Not necessarily. See my comment above. –  mob Mar 20 at 14:30

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