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Assume i have a function checkTime like the one below where i have to check for multiple condition simultaneously.

var result=0;
function checkTime(time1, time2) {

    if (time1 >= 0 && time2 <= 0) {
        result = 1;
    }
    else if (time1 >= 0 && time2 <= 1) {
        result = 4;
    }
    else if (time1 >= 2 && time2 <= 3) {
        result = 5;
    }
    else if (time1 >= 4 && time2 <= 6) {
        result = 6;
    }
    else if (time1 >= 7 && time2 <= 9) {
        result = 7;
    }
    else if (time1 >= 11 && time2 <= 12) {
        result = 8;
    }
    else if (time1 >= 13 && time2 <= 15) {
        result = 9;
    }
    else if (time1 >= 16 && time2 <= 17) {
        result = 10;
    }
    else if (time1 >= 19 && time2 <= 20) {
        result = 11;
    }
    return result;
}

(The above given example is hypothetical)

The function i have used totally works,but:

  • Is there a better method or procedure or formula to replace this?(where it doesnt have to be this lengthy or ugly)

Thanx!

share|improve this question
    
@downvoter- Care to comment? –  Nevin Madhukar K Mar 20 '14 at 3:56
    
I assume that the result won't always be 0. Am I right? –  sabof Mar 20 '14 at 3:56
    
You can use OR if multiple conditions would assign the same value to result... hypothetically speaking. –  Felix Kling Mar 20 '14 at 3:56
    
Yup it varies.. its hypothetical.. as i have said. –  Nevin Madhukar K Mar 20 '14 at 3:56
    
There's generally a better way than a long string of if statements, but out of context it's difficult to comment. You hypothetical example doesn't seem to make a lot of sense. –  Hobo Sapiens Mar 20 '14 at 3:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use an array to represent all the combination:

tests = [
    { time1: 0, time2: 0, result: 1 },
    { time1: 0: time2: 1, result: 4 },
    ...
];

for (var i = 0; i < tests.length; i++) {
    if (time1 >= tests[i].time1 && time2 <= tests[i].time2) {
        return tests[i].result;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your answer looks good,i will see the other answers too before committing to this one. –  Nevin Madhukar K Mar 20 '14 at 4:06

If the code is identical, and only the values change, you could do something like this:

function checkTime(time1, time2) {
  [
    [0, 0, 0], 
    [0, 1, 0]
  ].forEach(function (it) {
    if (time1 >= it[0] && time2 <= it[1]) {
       return it[2];
    }
  });
}
share|improve this answer

Well, first off you have the possibility of an undefined result, so that makes things ambiguous. Should result start at 0 instead? This is an important detail. Second, you seem to be working with boundaries, so it would help to change the <= to < to make this clearer. (If so, the 7-9/11-12 section has a bug.) Third, you have an implicit comparison of time1 and time2, so make that explicit.

var result = 0;
var diff = time2 - time1;
var bounds = [21, 19, 16, 13, 11, 7, 4, 2, 0];
if (diff <= 0) result = 0; // unexpected outcome
else
    for (position = 1; position < bounds.length; ++position) {
        if (time1 >= bounds[position]) {
            if (time2 < bounds[position - 1]) {
                result = 3 + (bounds.size - position);
            }
            break;
        }
    }
return result;

Other implementations are possible, but it's hard to tell based on your question exactly what problem you're solving.

follow-up

This section of code has a gap:

else if (time1 >= 7 && time2 <= 9) {
    result = 7;
}
else if (time1 >= 11 && time2 <= 12) {
    result = 8;
}

If time = 10 and time2 = 10, there is no match. It's easy to miss this type of error when you are repeating yourself. Specifying lower and upper bounds for each condition is unnecessary repetition. Since I couldn't see a pattern to the bounds (which could be delegated to a function), I just put the lower bounds into an array and made sure it was sorted descending so that the loop could stop after the first match.

share|improve this answer
    
Its javascript,i have tagged it earlier. :) –  Nevin Madhukar K Mar 20 '14 at 4:33
    
Ok, must be too sleepy and missed the tags. –  ngreen Mar 20 '14 at 4:35
    
1. Result have been set to 0 initially,if that helps. 2. I didnt understand the bug (7-9/11-12) 3. yes making it explicit and coding it is one way of doing it,Implicit comparison is bad? –  Nevin Madhukar K Mar 20 '14 at 4:38
    
In general, I advocate making relationships explicit. In this case, your code assumes that time2 is always >= time, but it does so implicitly. By explicitly comparing the two, the intent is clearer. –  ngreen Mar 20 '14 at 4:46
    
I'm sure the comparator in the loop is wrong, but I may be too tired to fix it at this moment. –  ngreen Mar 20 '14 at 5:03

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