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Why use getters and setters?

Why use getters and setters?

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marked as duplicate by George Stocker Aug 9 '12 at 17:02

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

20  
Is it just me, or does anybody else see the irony that the question was originally tagged with its own answer, [encapsulation]? –  Greg Beech Feb 12 '10 at 14:51
2  
I have rolled it back to the original question. New questions should be asked with a new question, not by completely replacing it with an existing one. –  Greg Beech Feb 12 '10 at 14:53
1  
Amazingly, even the topic title of the dupe is exactly the same. Another evidence OP didn't search or look into list of "related topics" at all. –  BalusC Feb 12 '10 at 15:03
1  
Question isn't worded entirely correctly, but it's a valid question. –  Ryan Brunner Feb 12 '10 at 15:26

5 Answers 5

To limit access to an internal state of an object.

Consider the classic example of a class of geometric shapes. Say, a Circle object. When you set the radius, you may want to automatically calculate the area (which would be a read-only property)

class Circle
{
     float radius;

    public float Radius
    {
        get { return radius; }
        set { radius = value;  area = Math.Pi * radius * radius;}
    }

    float area;
    float Area
    {
        get { return area;}
    }
}

If you allowed direct access to the "radius" data member, you could not update area when it changed. Further, if you allowed direct access to area, users could change it willy-nilly without regard for radius.

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If there are separate fields for radius and area, not all combinations of field values will be valid. On the other hand, if one were to define the Area property to compute and return the area of the circle, then Radius could be replaced with a field and writing to it would "change" Area precisely as it should. It's better when practical, to define the semantics of a struct such that all possible combinations of field values are valid, than to design structs where that is not the case. –  supercat Nov 28 '12 at 20:38

To encapsulate, and that way you make how you store data within your class an implementation detail. If your class has a getter/setter:

private string _mystring = string.Empty;
public string SomeValue
{
 get
 {
   return _mystring;
 }
}

That allows you to change how you manage "SomeValue" in the future. For example, you may decide that rather than storing it in a string, it's actually going to be a Guid under the hood. Now you could go for:

private Guid _myguid= Guid.NewGuid();
public string SomeValue
{
 get
 {
   return _myguid.ToString();
 }
}

Anywhere that your class is used and the "SomeValue" property is accessed will remain unbroken this way.

Validation

You can also validate the value passed in as well, so in another example:

private string _mystring = "My Value";
public string SomeValue
{
 get
 {
   return _mystring;
 }
 set
 {
   if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(value))
   {
     throw new InvalidArgumentException();
   }
   else
   {
     _myString = value;
   }
 }
}

To ensure that the stored string is never set to a null/empty string

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to encapsulate.

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One reason is to provide a more uniform interface to an object in some languages- you no longer have to deal with the syntactic difference between fields and methods; you always deal with methods.

A second reason is that you hide the implementation of the object, allowing you to change it internally without affecting its clients. A classic example is one of coordinates - if you have a coordinate represented via cartesian coordinates, and switch the internal representation to polar, if you used getters and setters your program would still work even though the x and y fields are gone. This also allows you to use polymorphism - two objects representing the same abstraction, but each with a different implementation of their state.

Accessing state via methods also lets you add things like synchronization.

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If you make a field private and set up a getter and a setter to access it, then all other code has to go through those methods to get at that data. Then, you have more control.

  • You can make it read-only (no setter).
  • You can validate input in the setter, and reject it if it's not acceptable.
  • You can instantiate the object only when needed, when the getter is first called.
  • You can change how it all works later.

You get these same benefits within the class, too, if you strictly use the getter and setter to access the field. So for many people it's something they do all the time.

Getters and setters initially don't look so great because they seem like a lot of extra typing. But IDEs like Eclipse can automatically make getters and setters for you, if you like. Languages like Objective-C and Ruby can do that too, using abbreviated syntax. C# can wrap getters and setters in "properties", which are used in code just like fields, but under the hood it calls the getter and setter that you write.

So there are a lot of reasons to use getters and setters, and many facilities to make it less painful.

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