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I want to call my .NET code from unmanaged C++. My process entrypoint is .NET based, so I don't have to worry about hosting the CLR. I know it can be done using COM wrappers for .NET objects, but I would like to access individual static methods of managed classes, so COM isn't my shortest/easiest route.

Thanks!

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possible duplicate of Exporting dll functions to unmanaged programs –  Rohit Oct 18 '13 at 4:38
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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Assuming you are talking about real unmanaged code - not just native C++ running in a mixed-mode assembly compiled with /clr - the easiest way is to create a wrapper to your .NET code in C++/CLI. You can then export the C++/CLI methods by just marking them with __declspec(dllexport).

Alternatively, if you have control over the invocation of the unmanaged code, you can marshal function-pointers to your .NET methods and pass them to the unmanaged code.

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Look at this solution: https://sites.google.com/site/robertgiesecke/Home/uploads/unmanagedexports The solution allows to call C# function from C by decorating your function with [DllExport] attribute (opposite of P/Invoke DllImport).

Exmaple:

C# code

class Test
{
     [DllExport("add", CallingConvention = CallingConvention.StdCall)]
     public static int Add(int left, int right)
     {
         return left + right;
     } 
}

C code:

 int main()
 {
      int z = add(5,10);
      printf("The solution is found!!! Z is %i",z);
      return 0;
 }

Output:

The solution is found!!! Z is 15
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How do I include the dll in the unmanaged project? Is there an example project somewhere (e.g. for visual studio)? –  habakuk Oct 9 '13 at 10:11
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Take a look at the GCHandle class and the gcroot keyword, which provides a typesafe, templated wrapper around GCHandle.

You can use these to hold a reference to a CLR object (or a boxed value) in native code.

MSDN has a basic tutorial here.

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Note that this requires /clr to be enabled. –  Rasmus Faber Oct 22 '08 at 12:25
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I believe you are looking for Reverse PInvoke. If you google for reverse pinvoke you'll get a lot of helpful entries. I think the following has a good quick and dirty example.

PInvoke-Reverse PInvoke and __stdcall - __cdecl

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Your calling code is C++ with /clr enabled. Right?

If yes, then you can simply use the using statement to use your .NET dll in your code. Something like:

#using <Mydll.dll>

and then you can simply make the objects of your managed classes like:

MyNameSpace::MyClass^ obj = new MyNameSpace::MyClass();

If you want to make this obj a data member of your class the using gcroot is the way to go.

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useful, but he did say "from unmanaged C++". /clr stops it being unmanaged. –  gbjbaanb Oct 22 '08 at 12:07
    
I think this is what he specifically mentioned. <i>My process entrypoint is .NET based, so I don't have to worry about hosting the CLR</i> –  Aamir Oct 22 '08 at 12:09
    
He might also have meant that he is P/Invoking into a completely unmanaged C++ dll and want to call back into the CLR again. –  Rasmus Faber Oct 22 '08 at 12:26
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