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I'm looking for algorithms like ones in the stl (push_heap, pop_heap, make_heap) except with the ability to pop both the minimum and maximum value efficiently. AKA double ended priority queue. As described here.

Any clean implementation of a double ended priority queue would also be of interest as an alternative, however this question is mainly about a MinMax Heap implementation.

My google-fu has not been fruitful, but surely, it must exist?

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1  
How about: std::priority_queue<T, std::deque<T>, C>? –  dirkgently Feb 12 '10 at 15:30
    
@Dirk - I thought std::priority_queue only guaranteed its first element to be the greatest. Are there any guarantees about the last one as well? –  Manuel Feb 12 '10 at 15:55
1  
@Manuel: I was replying to the "Any clean implementation of a double ended priority queue [...]" part of the post. –  dirkgently Feb 12 '10 at 16:17
    
@Dirk - sorry I missed that –  Manuel Feb 12 '10 at 16:22
3  
@Dirk - is your suggestion a double-ended priority queue? - It looks to me like a single-ended priority queue that just happens to be stored in an std::deque rather than an std::vector or array or whatever. –  Steve314 Feb 21 '10 at 12:24
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6 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted
+50

If you're looking for algorithm implementation try directly Google Code Search.

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I'm curious: why make your answer community wiky? –  Manuel Feb 17 '10 at 8:26
2  
Thought that people might want to add more Code Search engines... –  Eugen Constantin Dinca Feb 17 '10 at 16:11
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Is there a reason you can't use std::set? It sounds like that, along with some wrappers to access and remove set::begin() and --set::end() will solve the problem. I imagine it will be difficult to find something that can generally do a MinMax Heap much faster than the default implementation of set.

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Using std::set like you suggest is a workaround. It may be fine, but the MinMax heap would be the optimal solution for my problem, which is why I am asking for it specifically. But it's useful to keep in mind that std::set does more or less the same thing, so thanks for pointing it out. –  porgarmingduod Feb 12 '10 at 19:30
1  
Perhaps lack of a unique key ? The keys in a set it is sorted by must be unique but not in a priority queue or double ended priority queue. –  Slauma Feb 12 '10 at 19:33
3  
@Slauma There's also std::multiset. –  JonM Feb 12 '10 at 19:44
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But for large heaps / lots of operations the set implementation will be slower than a minimax heap... a minimax heap has the same time complexity as a normal heap, i.e. has O(1) find-min / find-max operations whereas for a general set implementation find-min and find-max are typically O(log n). –  Antti Huima Feb 16 '10 at 23:47
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I've upvoted antti.huimas comment, but it could be premature optimisation. Abstract the queue, maybe, so that the implementation can be swapped out if genuinely needed. Or don't - the refactoring to swap it out if needed probably won't be much anyway. Also, I believe that finding the end-points in std::set is actually O(1) anyway - that the set object actually holds pointers to the min and max nodes as well as the root, so that begin() and end() are handled efficiently. –  Steve314 Feb 21 '10 at 12:30
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I can't find any good implementations, but since no one else can either I'm guessing you'll be writing your own, in which case I have a few handy references for you.

A paper that no one seems to have mentioned is the original proposition for Min-Max-Heaps:

http://www.cs.otago.ac.nz/staffpriv/mike/Papers/MinMaxHeaps/MinMaxHeaps.pdf

I've implemented a min-max heap from this paper twice (not in C) and found it fairly trivial.

An improvement, which I haven't ever implemented, is a Min-Max-Fine-Heap. I can't find any good papers or references on a plain old fine heap, but I did find one on the min-max-fine-heap, which apparently performs better:

http://arxiv.org/ftp/cs/papers/0007/0007043.pdf

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I actually found a different (and improved) approach to my problem that didn't require a MinMax Heap. I just put a bounty on the question hoping something useful would come out of this. I already found that paper you link by the way, but it's a good thing you added it here for reference. –  porgarmingduod Feb 17 '10 at 0:42
    
+1 for the first document which is well written with some useful psuedocode. –  JonM Feb 22 '10 at 0:10
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My google-fu has led me to this:

Header file

Implementation file

Example

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I swear I entered the exact same query as you. I guess google.es is just better. ;) –  porgarmingduod Feb 12 '10 at 16:19
    
Can't say I really like that implementation though. It doesn't even have a license, and I'm not sure how much I trust some random code written for a school project. –  porgarmingduod Feb 12 '10 at 16:39
3  
Yeah the #include "MinMaxHeap.C" part is kind of unsettling :) –  Manuel Feb 12 '10 at 16:44
    
Probably better to use the std::set solution than this. But +1 –  Billy ONeal Feb 14 '10 at 17:58
1  
links are all dead –  ARH Jan 7 '13 at 6:15
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Not sure if this is exactly what you're looking for, but here is a MinMax Heap i created back in my university days. This was part of a larger project so, there is an extraneous reference on a 'Stopwatch' class which measured performance. I'm not including this class as it isn't my work. It isn't hard to strip it out so i'm leaving the reference to it as it is.

The code on snipplr

To use, just create a new instance of the heap with whatever type you want to use. (Note, custom types would need to overload comparison operators). Create array of that type and then pass it to the constructor and specify the current array size and what the maximum should be. This implementation works on top of a passed array only since this is the only thing i needed, but you have everything you need to implement push and pop methods.

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Sorry for lengthy code but it works fine except it may complicate to read and may contain some unnecessary variables and I am not uploading the Insert function. Use it as include .h file.

#include <math.h>
#define bool int
#define true 1
#define false 0
#define Left(i) (2 * (i))
#define Right(i) (2 * (i) + 1)
#define Parent(i) ((i) / 2)

void TrickleDown(int* A, int n)
{
    int i;
    for (i = 1; i <= n / 2; i++)
    {

        if (isMinLevel(i, n) == true)
            TrickleDownMin(A, i, n);
        else
            TrickleDownMax(A, i, n);
        Print(A, n);
        printf("i = %d\n", i);
    }
}

int isMinLevel(int i, int n)//i is on min level or not
{
    int h = 2;
    if (i == 1)
        return true;
    while (true)
    {
        if (i >= pow(2, h) && i <= pow(2, h + 1) - 1)
            return true;
        else if (i > n || i < pow(2, h))
            return false;
        h += 2;
    }
}

void swap(int* a, int* b)
{
    *a ^= *b;
    *b ^= *a;
    *a ^= *b;
}

void TrickleDownMin(int* A, int i, int n)
{
    int m, lc, rc, mc, lclc, lcrc, mlc, rclc, rcrc, mrc;
    int child;
    lc = Left(i);
    if (lc > n) // A[i] has no children
        return;
    else
    {
        rc = Right(i);
        mc = rc > n ? lc : (A[lc] > A[rc]) ? rc : lc;
        child = true; // keep tracking m comes from children or grandchildren
        // m = smallest of children and grand children
        lclc = Left(lc);
        if (lclc <= n)
        {
            lcrc = Right(lc);
            mlc = lcrc > n ? lclc :(A[lclc] > A[lcrc]) ? lcrc : lclc;
            mc = mlc > mc ? mc : mlc;
            if (mc == mlc)
                child = false;
        }
        rclc = Left(rc);
        if (rclc <= n)
        {
            rcrc = Right(rc);
            mrc = rcrc > n ? rclc : (A[rclc] > A[rcrc]) ? rcrc : rclc;
            mc = mrc > mc ? mc : mrc;
            if (mc == mrc)
                child = false;
        }
        m = mc;
        if (!child)//m is one of the child of i
        {
            if (A[m] < A[i])
            {
                swap(&A[m], &A[i]);
                if (A[m] > A[Parent(m)])
                    swap(&A[m], &A[Parent(m)]);
                TrickleDownMin(A, i, m);
            }
        }
        else    //m is child of i
        {
            if (A[m] < A[i])
                swap(&A[i], &A[m]);
        }

    }
}

void TrickleDownMax(int* A, int i, int n)
{
    int m, lc, rc, mc, lclc, lcrc, mlc, rclc, rcrc, mrc;
    int child;
    lc = Left(i);
    if (lc > n)//A[i] has no children
        return;
    else
    {
        rc = Right(i);
        mc = rc > n ? lc : (A[lc] < A[rc]) ? rc : lc;
        child = true; //keep tracking m comes from choldren or grandchildren
        //m = greatest of children and grand children
        lclc = Left(lc);
        if (lclc <= n)
        {
            lcrc = Right(lc);
            mlc = lcrc < n ? lclc : (A[lclc] < A[lcrc]) ? lcrc : lclc;
            mc = mlc < mc ? mc : mlc;
            if (mc == mlc)
                child = false;
        }
        rclc = Left(rc);
        if (rclc <= n)
        {
            rcrc = Right(rc);
            mrc = rcrc < n ? rclc : (A[rclc] < A[rcrc]) ? rcrc : rclc;
            mc = mrc < mc ? mc : mrc;
            if (mc == mrc)
                child = false;
        }
        m = mc;
        if (!child)//m is one of the child of i
        {
            if (A[m] > A[i])
            {
                swap(&A[m], &A[i]);
                if (A[m] < A[Parent(m)])
                    swap(&A[m], &A[Parent(m)]);
                TrickleDownMax(A, i, m);
            }
        }
        else      //m is child of i
        {
            if (A[m] > A[i])
                swap(&A[i], &A[m]);
        }

    }
}

void Print(int* a, int n)
{
    int i;
    for (i = 1; i < n + 1; i++)
    {
        printf("%d  ", a[i]);
    }

}

int DeleteMin(int* A, int n)
{
    int min_index = 1;
    int min = A[1];
    swap(&A[min_index], &A[n]);
    n--;
    TrickleDown(A, n);
    return min;
}

int DeleteMax(int* A, int n)
{
    int max_index, max;
    max_index = n < 3 ? 2 : (A[2] > A[3]) ? 2 : 3;
    max = A[max_index];
    swap(&A[max_index], &A[n]);
    n--;
    TrickleDown(A, n);
    return max;
}
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1  
Sorry, have to -1 this. The first 3 #define lines alone are undefined behavior (why are you redefining bool, true, and false?), the following lines are bad style (use functions), and you rewrote swap for no reason (that's an incorrect implementation, by the way; consider when a == b). Good for providing an implementation, but I personally don't think a bad implementation is better than none. –  GManNickG Jun 23 '13 at 8:53
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